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A Room of One's Own (Hardcover)

Author:  Virginia Woolf
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A Room of Ones Own Woolf, Virginia 1 of 1
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Learn more about A Room of One's Own:

Format: Hardcover
ISBN-10: 0151787336
ISBN-13: 9780151787333
Sku: 30018926
Publish Date: 10/1/1991
Pages:  132
 
Originally published in 1929, A Room of One's Own eloquently states Woolf's conviction that in order to create works of genius, women must be freed from financial obligations and social restrictions.
Annotation:
Woolf's ardent plea for women's share in power, wealth, and fame is a seminal feminist text. This extended essay is an articulation of her belief that all a woman needs is an income that will sustain her, and her own room in which to work.
Author Bio
Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf was the third of four children born to Leslie Stephen, who was editor of the Dictionary of National Biography, and the beautiful Julia Prinsep Duckworth Jackson, later to be the models for Mr. and Mrs. Ramsay in TO THE LIGHTHOUSE. Virginia and her sister Vanessa were educated at home, though their brothers went away to school and later to Cambridge. The girls did, however, have the run of their father's extensive library. An outstandingly precocious child in a gifted family, Virginia decided very early to be a writer, and at age 9 began producing a family newspaper. When she was 13, her adored mother died, and shortly after that her older half-sister Stella, who served as a surrogate--traumas from which Virginia never entirely recovered. Beginning in 1895, she had recurring bouts of suicidal madness--one reason she and Leonard Woolf, whom she married in 1912, never had children. After the death of their father, the Stephen siblings moved to the part of London known as Bloomsbury, and thus began the famed Bloomsbury Group--a loose collection of friends who were also writers and artists. Virginia and Leonard Woolf founded the Hogarth Press as a distraction for Virginia after one of her bouts of madness, and it became one of Britain's most distinguished imprints, publishing not only their own books but those of their contemporaries, including Sigmund Freud. Overcome by her mental illness, and depressed about the prospects for England during the Second World War, Virginia Woolf drowned herself in 1941.

Product Attributes

Product attributeBook Format:   Hardcover
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0132
Product attributePublisher:   Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH)
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