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All the Birds of North America American Bird Conservancy's Field Guide (Paperback)

Author:  Jack L. Griggs
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Learn more about All the Birds of North America:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0060527706
ISBN-13: 9780060527709
Sku: 31065336
Publish Date: 11/1/2002
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8.5H x 3.25L x 0.75T
Pages:  400
Age Range:  16 to 21
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A Surer, Faster, Easier Way to Identify Birds

At last, a guide that successfully organizes birds by field-recognizable features for quick identification. For lack of a better method, bird guides have traditionally placed birds in evolutionary sequence, resulting in birding's classic Catch-22 -- you must recognize an unknown bird and know its place in the sequence before you can took it up!

"All the Birds" arranges species by their feeding adaptations -- features that are easily observed. How a bird feeds largely determines its form. It's nature's way of organizing species to fit ecological niches. The powerful bills and tree-climbing habits of woodpeckers, for instance, are prominent feeding adaptations. Recognizing birds' adaptations for feeding is the natural, no-nonsense way to identify; learn, and understand them.

From the Publisher:
A Surer, Faster, Easier Way to Identify Birds

At last, a guide that successfully organizes birds by field-recognizable features for quick identification. For lack of a better method, bird guides have traditionally placed birds in evolutionary sequence, resulting in birding's classic Catch-22 -- you must recognize an unknown bird and know its place in the sequence before you can took it up!

All the Birds arranges species by their feeding adaptations -- features that are easily observed. How a bird feeds largely determines its form. It's nature's way of organizing species to fit ecological niches. The powerful bills and tree-climbing habits of woodpeckers, for instance, are prominent feeding adaptations. Recognizing birds' adaptations for feeding is the natural, no-nonsense way to identify; learn, and understand them.

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