Bridges Of Memory : Chicago's First Wave Of Black Migration (Paperback)

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In their first great migration to Chicago that began during World War I, African Americans came from the South seeking a better life--and fleeing a Jim Crow system of racial prejudice, discrimination, and segregation. What they found was much less than what they'd hoped for, but it was much better than what they'd come from--and in the process they set in motion vast changes not only in Chicago but also in the whole fabric of American society. This book, the first of three volumes, revisits this momentous chapter in American history with those who lived it.
Oral history of the first order, "Bridges of Memory lets us hear the voices of those who left social, political, and economic oppression for political freedom and opportunity such as they'd never known--and for new forms of prejudice and segregation. These children and grandchildren of ex-slaves found work in the stockyards and steel mills of Chicago, settled and started small businesses in the "Black Belt" on the South Side, and brought forth the jazz, blues, and gospel music that the city is now known for. Historian Timuel D. Black, Jr., himself the son of first-generation migrants to Chicago, interviews a wide cross-section of African Americans whose remarks and reflections touch on issues ranging from fascism to Jim Crow segregation to the origin of the blues. Their recollections comprise a vivid record of a neighborhood, a city, a society, and a people undergoing dramatic and unprecedented changes.

Specifications

Publisher Northwestern Univ Pr
Mfg Part# 9780810123151
SKU 30896529
Format Paperback
ISBN10 0810123150
Release Date 4/23/2007
Physical
Dimensions (in Inches) 10H x 7L x 1.5T
Author Info
Studs Terkel
Studs Terkel grew up in Chicago and attended the University of Chicago and the University of Chicago Law School. He aired a daily radio program on WFMT, Chicago, which was carried on stations throughout the country. His distinctive oral history approach to reporting on the lives of ordinary working Americans has earned him a reputation as an acclaimed journalist.
Studs Terkel grew up in Chicago and attended the University of Chicago and the University of Chicago Law School. He aired a daily radio program on WFMT, Chicago, which was carried on stations throughout the country. His distinctive oral history approach to reporting on the lives of ordinary working Americans has earned him a reputation as an acclaimed journalist.
In his 91 years, John Hope Franklin saw many changes in American life, not the least of which was the election and inauguration just prior to his death of America's first African American president. As a historian, Franklin wrote about several different epochs, and at least one of his books was a classic: FROM FREEDOM TO SLAVERY, published in 1947. Franklin recalls his long life in his memoir MIRROR TO AMERICA, in which he recalls both daily insults and great achievements. Franklin was the son of a lawyer. He attended Fisk University and earned his doctorate at Harvard, then taught in many institutions of the first rank, including Brooklyn College, where he chaired the English department, and the University of Chicago. Scholarship and teaching were his paramount concerns, but he also served on the research team that prepared material for the case Brown v. Board of Education.
From the Publisher
Editors Note In their first great migration to Chicago that began during World War I, African Americans came from the South seeking a better life--and fleeing a Jim Crow system of racial prejudice, discrimination, and segregation. What they found was much less than what they'd hoped for, but it was much better than what they'd come from--and in the process they set in motion vast changes not only in Chicago but also in the whole fabric of American society. This book, the first of three volumes, revisits this momentous chapter in American history with those who lived it. Oral history of the first order, Bridges of Memory lets us hear the voices of those who left social, political, and economic oppression for political freedom and opportunity such as they'd never known--and for new forms of prejudice and segregation. These children and grandchildren of ex-slaves found work in the stockyards and steel mills of Chicago, settled and started small businesses in the "Black Belt" on the South Side, and brought forth the jazz, blues, and gospel music that the city is now known for. Historian Timuel D. Black, Jr., himself the son of first-generation migrants to Chicago, interviews a wide cross-section of African Americans whose remarks and reflections touch on issues ranging from fascism to Jim Crow segregation to the origin of the blues. Their recollections comprise a vivid record of a neighborhood, a city, a society, and a people undergoing dramatic and unprecedented changes.
Editors Note 1 Offers a collection of more than 150 interviews with black Chicagoans affected by the great migration of southern blacks to the North during World War II.
Product Attributes
Book Format Paperback
Number of Pages 0656
Publisher Northwestern University Press
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