Ships from/sold by Buy.com
advertisement
Earn Super Points: Write a Review
Sorry, this selection is currently unavailable.
Changing Visions: Human Cognitive Maps: Past, Present, and Future Artigiani, Robert                       |Combs, Allan                            |Csanyi, Vilmos                           1 of 1
$124.66  + Free Shipping
EARN 125 RAKUTEN SUPER POINTS™ Super Points
What are Rakuten Super Points™?
Get rewarded when you shop! Earn 1 point per dollar spent. That's like getting cash back on every purchase. Easy to see matured points in checkout. Use points just like cash.
Learn More
FORMAT: Hardcover
ALSO AVAILABLE: Other Formats Choose Format
CONDITION:  Brand New
IN STOCK: Usually Ships within 1 business day
45 day return policy
Share
promo
 
Description
 

Learn more about Changing Visions: Human Cognitive Maps: Past, Present, and Future:

Format: Hardcover
ISBN-10: 0275956768
ISBN-13: 9780275956769
Sku: 211995633
Publish Date: 9/1/2009
Pages:  144
Age Range:  NA
See more in Cognitive Psychology
 
We all carry a picture of the world in our mind, but is that "map" an assuredly true layout of the reality that surrounds us? If not, how can we use it to guide our steps toward the 21st century and beyond without creating shocks and surprises that impair our well-being and threaten our survival? We shall not survive, either as individuals or as a species, if our maps fail to reflect accurately the nature of the world that surrounds us. The authors attempt, through reviewing the origins, development, and current changes in individual and social cognitive maps, to prompt readers to become more conscious of their own map, and hence be better able to adapt it to the exigencies of our changing world. The book ends with a vision of the global bio- and socio-sphere: the unified cognitive map which is emerging in laboratories and workshops of the new physics, the new biology, the new ecology, and the avant-garde branches of the social and historical sciences. But Changing Visions recognizes that these sciences alone cannot promote the formation of faithful maps of lived reality, and that religion, common sense, and even art can fill in and sharpen one's world-picture.
Advertisement Bottom