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Contempt and Pity Social Policy and the Image of the Damaged Black Psyche, 1880-1996 (Paperback)

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Contempt and Pity Scott, Daryl Michael 1 of 1
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FORMAT: Paperback
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Description
 

Learn more about Contempt and Pity:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 080784635X
ISBN-13: 9780807846353
Sku: 30166903
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 9.5H x 6.5L x 1T
Pages:  296
 
For over a century, the idea that African Americans are psychologically damaged has played an important role in discussions of race. In this provocative work, Daryl Michael Scott argues that damage imagery has been the product of liberals and conservatives, of racists and antiracists. While racial conservatives, often playing on white contempt for blacks, have sought to use findings of black pathology to justify exclusionary policies, racial liberals have used damage imagery primarily to promote policies of inclusion and rehabilitation.

In advancing his argument, Scott challenges some long-held beliefs about the history of damage imagery. He rediscovers the liberal impulses behind Stanley Elkins's Sambo hypothesis and Daniel Patrick Moynihan's "Negro Family" and exposes the damage imagery in the work of Ralph Ellison, the leading anti-pathologist. He also corrects the view that the Chicago School depicted blacks as pathological products of matriarchy. New Negro experts such as Charles Johnson and E. Franklin Frazier, he says, disdained sympathy-seeking and refrained from exploring individual pathology. Scott's reassessment of social science sheds new light on "Brown v. Board of Education," revealing how experts reversed four decades of theory in order to represent segregation as inherently damaging to blacks.

In this controversial work, Scott warns the Left of the dangers in their recent rediscovery of damage imagery in an age of conservative reform.

From the Publisher:
A groundbreaking exploration of the social construction of race that has much to teach both liberals and conservatives For over a century, the idea that African Americans are psychologically damaged has played an important role in discussions of race. In this provocative work, Daryl Michael Scott argues that damage imagery has been the product of liberals and conservatives, of racists and antiracists. While racial conservatives, often playing on white contempt for blacks, have sought to use findings of black pathology to justify exclusionary policies, racial liberals have used damage imagery primarily to promote policies of inclusion and rehabilitation. In advancing his argument, Scott challenges some long-held beliefs about the history of damage imagery. He rediscovers the liberal impulses behind Stanley Elkins's Sambo hypothesis and Daniel Patrick Moynihan's Negro Family and exposes the damage imagery in the work of Ralph Ellison, the leading anti-pathologist. He also corrects the view that the Chicago School depicted blacks as pathological products of matriarchy. New Negro experts such as Charles Johnson and E. Franklin Frazier, he says, disdained sympathy-seeking and refrained from exploring individual pathology. Scott's reassessment of social science sheds new light on Brown v. Board of Education, revealing how experts reversed four decades of theory in order to represent segregation as inherently damaging to blacks. In this controversial work, Scott warns the Left of the dangers in their recent rediscovery of damage imagery in an age of conservative reform.For over a century, the idea that African Americans are psychologically damaged has played an important role in discussions of race. In this provocative work, Daryl Michael Scott argues that damage imagery has been the product of liberals and conservatives, of racists and antiracists. While racial conservatives, often playing on white contempt for blacks, have sought to use findings of black pathology to justify exclusionary policies, racial liberals have used damage imagery primarily to promote policies of inclusion and rehabilitation.

In advancing his argument, Scott challenges some long-held beliefs about the history of damage imagery. He rediscovers the liberal impulses behind Stanley Elkins's Sambo hypothesis and Daniel Patrick Moynihan's Negro Family and exposes the damage imagery in the work of Ralph Ellison, the leading anti-pathologist. He also corrects the view that the Chicago School depicted blacks as pathological products of matriarchy. New Negro experts such as Charles Johnson and E. Franklin Frazier, he says, disdained sympathy-seeking and refrained from exploring individual pathology. Scott's reassessment of social science sheds new light on Brown v. Board of Education, revealing how experts reversed four decades of theory in order to represent segregation as inherently damaging to blacks.

In this controversial work, Scott warns the Left of the dangers in their recent rediscovery of damage imagery in an age of conservative reform.

Praise

New Republic
"What is surprising, and what gives Scott's book its bite, is that notions of black inferiority triumphed among liberals, especially those who thought that they were advancing the cause of racial equality....[T]heir reliance on images of damage, as Scott argues, was an effort not to invoke not solidarity, but pity. And pity, even when it is well-intentioned, is never far from contempt." - Alan Wolfe 07/07/1997

Quarterly Black Review of Books
"In the end, the conclusion that Scott advances is that the perpetuation of damage imagery, or of the psychologically scarred black, will never serve us well as a race or as a nation. Contempt and pity are counterproductive as primary emotions driving social change. Meaningful change, Scott notes, can only be achieved when the formerly oppressed are viewed as equals without the baggage of scientific racism and political expediency." - Robert Fleming january/February 1998

Product Attributes

Product attributeeBooks:   Kobo
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0296
Product attributePublisher:   University of North Carolina Press
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