Ships from/sold by Buy.com
advertisement

Dance for Export Cultural Diplomacy and the Cold War (Paperback)

Author:  Naima/ Foner Prevots Introduction: Eric Foner  Eric Foner
Earn Super Points: Write a Review
Sorry, this selection is currently unavailable.
Dance for Export Prevots, Naima/ Foner, Eric (INT) 1 of 1
$19.95
$19.94 + $3.10 SHIPPING
EARN 20 RAKUTEN SUPER POINTS™ Super Points
What are Rakuten Super Points™?
Get rewarded when you shop! Earn 1 point per dollar spent. That's like getting cash back on every purchase. Easy to see matured points in checkout. Use points just like cash.
Learn More
FORMAT: Paperback
CONDITION:  Brand New
TEMPORARILY SOLD OUT.:
More inventory may be available. Place your order today and be one of the first to receive this product when it arrives!
Alert me when this item is in stock.
45 day return policy
Share
promo
 
Description
 

Learn more about Dance for Export:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0819564648
ISBN-13: 9780819564641
Sku: 30716774
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 9.75H x 6.75L x 0.5T
Pages:  188
Age Range:  NA
See more in Political Science
 
At the height of the Cold War in 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower inaugurated a program of cultural exchange that sent American dancers and other artists to political "hot spots" overseas. This peacetime gambit by a wartime hero to win the hearts and minds of Cold War enemies was a resounding success.

Among the artists chosen for international duty were Jose Limon, who led his company on the first government-sponsored tour of South America; Martha Graham, whose famed ensemble crisscrossed southeast Asia; Alvin Ailey, whose company brought audiences to their feet throughout the South Pacific; and George Balanchine, whose New York City Ballet crowned its triumphant visits to Western Europe and Japan with an epoch-making tour of the Soviet Union in 1962. The success of Eisenhower's program of cultural export led directly to the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts and Washington's Kennedy Center.

Naima Prevots draws on an array of previously unexamined sources, including formerly classified State Department documents, congressional committee hearings, and the minutes of the Dance Panel, to reveal the inner workings of "Eisenhower's Program, " the complex set of political, fiscal, and artistic interests that shaped it, and the ever-uneasy relationship between government and the arts in the United States.

From the Publisher:
At the height of the Cold War in 1954, President Eisenhower inaugurated a program of cultural exchange that sent American dancers and other artists to political "hot spots" overseas. This peacetime gambit by a warrior hero was a resounding success.

Among the artists chosen for international duty were Jose Limon, who led his company on the first government-sponsored tour of South America; Martha Graham, whose famed ensemble crisscrossed southeast Asia; Alvin Ailey, whose company brought audiences to their feet throughout the South Pacific; and George Balanchine, whose New York City Ballet crowned its triumphant visits to Western Europe and Japan with an epoch-making tour of the Soviet Union in 1962. The success of Eisenhower's program of cultural export led directly to the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts and Washington's Kennedy Center.

Naima Prevots draws on an array of previously unexamined sources, including formerly classified State Department documents, congressional committee hearings, and the minutes of the Dance Panel, to reveal the inner workings of "Eisenhower's Program," the complex set of political, fiscal, and artistic interests that shaped it, and the ever-uneasy relationship between government and the arts in the US.

CONTRIBUTORS: Eric Foner.

Product Attributes

Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0188
Product attributePublisher:   Wesleyan
Advertisement Bottom