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Author:  Philip K. Dick Introduction:  Roger Zelazny
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Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Dick, Philip K. 1 of 1
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Learn more about Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0345404475
ISBN-13: 9780345404473
Sku: 30050048
Publish Date: 6/1/1996
Sales Rank: 6337
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8.25H x 5.25L x 0.75T
Pages:  256
 
"A merry little surge of electricity piped by automatic alarm from the mood organ beside his bed awakened Rick Deckard. Surprised--it always surprised him to find himself awake without prior notice--he rose from the bed, stood up in his multicolored pajamas, and stretched." (from the first line)
"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world."
--John Brunner
THE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . .
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.
By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . .
They even built humans.
Emigrees to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in.
Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results.
"[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."
--Paul Williams
Rolling Stone
From the Publisher:
Captures the strange world of twenty-first-century Earth, a devastated planet in which sophisticated androids, banned from the planet, fight back against their potential destroyers
Annotation:
Rick Deckard would deny being called a murderer--"I've never killed a human being in my life." His job, however, is to kill (or "retire") androids who are trying to live amongst humans. The police department has to hire a bounty hunter like Deckard because androids have become virtually indistinguishable from humans. On Mars, bad things started happening when humans became too reliant on androids, so officials on Earth decided to make androids illegal. The only problem is that the androids want to stay--and they know how to fight back. Raising questions of consciousness, morality, love, and what it means to be human, Philip K. Dick's DO ANDROIDS DREAM OF ELECTRIC SHEEP has become a canonical work of speculative fiction. Originally published in 1968, this novel was made into the film BLADERUNNER, starring Harrison Ford, in 1982.
Author Bio
Philip K. Dick
Generally regarded as one of the most important American science fiction writers, Philip Kindred Dick was one of a pair of twins born on December 16, 1928; both suffered from a series of physical and mental problems, which would kill Dick's sister, Jane Kindred, 41 days later, and would continue to plague him for the rest of his life. Exacerbated by a voluminous intake of amphetamines, his health continued to worsen as he produced an enormous body of work--nearly 50 novels and 115 short stories in the 29 years following his first published story at the age of 24 to his death from a stroke at the age of 53. Characterized by feelings of paranoia and underlying pessimism, his work includes the 1963 Hugo Award-winning THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE--an alternate history account of the post-World War II United States--THE CONFESSIONS OF A CRAP ARTIST, loosely based on the breakup of his second marriage, and DO ANDROIDS DREAM OF ELECTRIC SHEEP?, which became the basis for the movie BLADE RUNNER. In 1974 he experienced what he referred to as a "mystical experience," which he spent the last nine years of his life exploring in an unfinished book called EXEGESIS. By the time he died, it had swollen to 8,000 pages. Though he is best known outside the science fiction community as having written the sources for the movies BLADE RUNNER and TOTAL RECALL, his work was instrumental in bringing about a radical shift in American science fiction, moving it away from the stereotypical space adventure, infusing it with explicit political content, and introducing psychological depth to the characters.

Product Attributes

Product attributeeBooks:   Kobo
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0256
Product attributePublisher:   Del Rey Books
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