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Doctor Zhivago (Paperback)

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Doctor Zhivago Pasternak, Boris Leonidovich/ Pevear, Richard (TRN)/ Volokhonsky, Larissa (TRN) 1 of 1
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Learn more about Doctor Zhivago:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0307390950
ISBN-13: 9780307390950
Sku: 221179448
Publish Date: 10/4/2011
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8.25H x 5.25L x 1.25T
Pages:  675
See more in Classics
 
On they went, singing "Rest Eternal," and whenever they stopped, their feet, the horses, and the gusts of wind seemed to carry on their singing. (from the first line)

First published in Italy in 1957 amid international controversy, "Doctor Zhivago" is the story of the life and loves of a poet/physician during the turmoil of the Russian Revolution. Taking his family from Moscow to what he hopes will be shelter in the Ural Mountains, Zhivago finds himself instead embroiled in the battle between the Whites and the Reds. Set against this backdrop of cruelty and strife is Zhivago''s love for the tender and beautiful Lara, the very embodiment of the pain and chaos of those cataclysmic times. Pevear and Volokhonsky masterfully restore the spirit of Pasternak''s original--his style, rhythms, voicings, and tone--in this beautiful translation of a classic of world literature.

From the Publisher:
It is the story of Zhivago, poet and physician, and his struggle to keep his family alive in the midst of the overwhelming chaos of the Russian Revolution. And, it is about Zhivago's love for the beautiful Lara, the woman he pursues beyond all reason, the human symbol of life's sweetness and joy....


From the Paperback edition.
Author Bio
Boris Pasternak
Boris Leonidovich Pasternak's father was a painter and his mother a pianist, and he was raised in an artistic, intellectual home. As an adolescent, Pasternak intended to become a composer, but he gave up music at age 19 and began to write verse. He published his first collection of poetry in 1914. During the First World War, Pasternak managed a draft board in the Urals. After the revolution, he worked briefly in the new education ministry. He continued to write poetry and prose, and his fame grew in the 1920s with each volume of poetry he published. When the Great Terror began in mid-1930s, he stopped publishing new poetry and made his living by translating works into Russian, especially the works of Shakespeare and Goethe. He defended his fellow poets (e.g., Mandelshtam) during the purges; his fame, and the regard Stalin had for his work, protected him during that time. Pasternak worked as a war correspondent during the Second World War. Throughout the 1940s and early 1950s he worked on his novel, DOCTOR ZHIVAGO. The novel ran into trouble with Soviet censors when Pasternak presented it for publication in 1956. He arranged for it to be published in Italy, and the last four years of his life were spent attending to the fallout from that decision. He refused the award of the Nobel Prize in literature in 1958 in a successful effort to stem the persecution campaign against him in the Soviet Union.

Boris Leonidovich Pasternak's father was a painter and his mother a pianist, and he was raised in an artistic, intellectual home. As an adolescent, Pasternak intended to become a composer, but he gave up music at age 19 and began to write verse. He published his first collection of poetry in 1914. During the First World War, Pasternak managed a draft board in the Urals. After the revolution, he worked briefly in the new education ministry. He continued to write poetry and prose, and his fame grew in the 1920s with each volume of poetry he published. When the Great Terror began in mid-1930s, he stopped publishing new poetry and made his living by translating works into Russian, especially the works of Shakespeare and Goethe. He defended his fellow poets (e.g., Mandelshtam) during the purges; his fame, and the regard Stalin had for his work, protected him during that time. Pasternak worked as a war correspondent during the Second World War. Throughout the 1940s and early 1950s he worked on his novel, DOCTOR ZHIVAGO. The novel ran into trouble with Soviet censors when Pasternak presented it for publication in 1956. He arranged for it to be published in Italy, and the last four years of his life were spent attending to the fallout from that decision. He refused the award of the Nobel Prize in literature in 1958 in a successful effort to stem the persecution campaign against him in the Soviet Union.

Praise

"'Doctor Zhivago' will come to stand as one of the great events in man's literary and moral history. Nobody could have written it in a totalitarian state and turned it loose on the world who did not have the courage of a genius. This book is a great act of faith in art and in the human spirit." - Edmund Wilson

"I began to read 'Doctor Zhivago' immediately on leaving [Pasternak], and finished it on the following day. Unlike some of its readers in both the Soviet Union and the west, I thought it a work of genius. It seemed--and seems to me to convey an entire range of human experience, to create a world, even if it contains only one genuine inhabitant, in language of unexampled imaginative power." - Sir Isaiah Berlin

Niagara Falls Gazette
"[A] sorry thing, clumsy and melodramatic, with stock situations, rambling robbers and trite coincidences." - Vladimir Nabokov 01/11/1959

"...now I am writing something entirely different: something new, quite new, luminous, elegant, harmonious, well-proportioned, classically pure and simple--what Winckelmann wanted, yes, and Goethe; and this will be my last word, and most important word, to the world. It is, yes, it is what I wish to be remembered by; I shall devote the rest of my life to it." - Boris Pasternak 1945

Product Attributes

Product attributeeBooks:   Kobo
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0675
Product attributePublisher:   Vintage Books
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