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Author:  Claudia Tate
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Domestic Allegories of Political Desire: The Black Heroines Text at the Turn of the Century Tate, Claudia 1 of 1
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FORMAT: Paperback
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Product Details:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0195108574
ISBN-13: 9780195108576
Sku: 30024505
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 9.25H x 6.25L x 0.75T
Pages:  312
 
Why did late nineteenth-century African-American women novelist use idealized stories of bourgeois courtship and marriage to mount arguments of social reform during a time when resurgent racism conditioned the lives of all black Americans? This is the question at the center of Tate's examination of the novels of Pauline Hopkins, Emma Kelley, Amelia Johnson, Katherine Tillman, and Frances Harper.
From the Publisher:
Why did late nineteenth-century African-American women novelist use idealized stories of bourgeois courtship and marriage to mount arguments of social reform during a time when resurgent racism conditioned the lives of all black Americans? This is the question at the center of Tate's examination of the novels of Pauline Hopkins, Emma Kelley, Amelia Johnson, Katherine Tillman, and Frances Harper.Why did African-American women novelists use idealized stories of bourgeois courtship and marriage to mount arguments on social reform during the last decade of the nineteenth century, during a time when resurgent racism conditioned the lives of all black Americans? Such stories now seem like apolitical fantasies to contemporary readers. This is the question at the center of Tate's examination of the novels of Pauline Hopkins, Emma Kelley, Amelia Johnson, Katherine Tillman, and Frances Harper. Domestic Allegories of Political Desire is more than a literary study; it is also a social and intellectual history--a cultural critique of a period that historian Rayford W. Logan called "the Dark Ages of recent American history." Against a rich contextual framework, extending from abolitionist protest to the Black Aesthetic, Tate argues that the idealized marriage plot in these novels does not merely depict the heroine's happiness and economic prosperity. More importantly, that plot encodes a resonant cultural narrative--a domestic allegory--about the political ambitions of an emancipated people. Once this domestic allegory of political desire is unmasked in these novels, it can be seen as a significant discourse of the post-Reconstruction era for representing African-Americans' collective dreams about freedom and for reconstructing those contested dreams into consummations of civil liberty.
Annotation:
Why did late 19th-century African-American women novelists use idealized stories of bourgeois courtship and marriage to mount arguments on social reform during a time when resurgent racism conditioned the lives of all black Americans? This is the question at the center of Tate's examination of the novels of Pauline Hopkins, Emma Kelley, Amelia Johnson, Katherine Tillman, and Frances Harper.

Praise

Women's Review of Books
"A ground-breaking work....As a pioneering work, it is itself critical history."

American Historical Review
"Tate has given us a treasure....Because of her familiarity with Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction historiography, and because of her sensitive reading of the materials she uses, Tate's book deserves an honored place in historical
literature."

Product Attributes
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0312
Product attributePublisher:   Oxford University Press, USA
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