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Dubliners (Hardcover)

Author:  James Joyce
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Dubliners Joyce, James 1 of 1
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Learn more about Dubliners:

Format: Hardcover
ISBN-10: 1904919537
ISBN-13: 9781904919537
Sku: 230054313
Publish Date: 8/13/2012
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 6.25H x 4L x 0.75T
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From the Publisher:

Joyce?s first major work, written when he was only twenty-five, brought his city to the world for the first time. His stories are rooted in the rich detail of Dublin life, portraying ordinary, often defeated lives with unflinching realism. He writes of social decline, sexual desire and exploitation, corruption, and personal failure, yet creates a brilliantly compelling, unique vision of the world and of human experience.

Annotation:
Joyce's celebrated short-story sequence provides a vivid and disturbing picture of early 20th-century Dublin and its inhabitants, whom Joyce saw as trapped in a repressed and stultifying environment. The stories are divided into five types: childhood, adolescence, marriage, maturity, and various aspects of public life, including politics. They embody Joyce's belief in the value of what he called epiphanies--insights into life that can be compared to the religious concept of the Epiphany, and that Joyce believed art can provide via the transformation of mundane events. The last story, "The Dead"--the brilliant and moving dissection of a failed marriage--actually takes place on the Feast of the Epiphany.
Author Bio
James Joyce
During Joyce's growing-up years, his family progressed from middle-class gentility to shabbiness, moving all over the city of Dublin to a series of increasingly rundown houses. He was raised in a repressively Catholic and Philistine atmosphere, attending Jesuit institutions, but by age 16 he was beginning to question Catholicism and to see himself as a writer who would need to transcend his heritage. In 1902 he received a B.A. from University College in Dublin, in modern languages. At that point, he left for Paris, knowing instinctively that in order to write objectively about his homeland he would have to live in exile. After a brief return to Ireland, he settled permanently on the continent in 1904 with Nora Barnacle, an uneducated Dublin girl he called his "portable Ireland." (Nora used to ask him, "Why don't you write books people can read?") The couple lived in Trieste, where Joyce taught English and wrote many of his major works, from 1904 until 1915. Eventually, they settled in Paris, remaining until 1940 (finally marrying in 1931 and producing two children) when they were forced by wartime necessity to evacuate to Switzerland, where Joyce died soon after. Joyce was never financially solvent and relied on the assistance of patrons who believed in his genius. He lived as an expatriate for most of his life, but wrote only about his native city, making Dublin a microcosm of all human experience. In the year 2000, Joyce's handwritten draft of the "Circe" chapter from ULYSSES sold at auction for $1.54 million--an ironic coda to the life of a writer who was perennially short of cash.

During James Joyce's growing-up years in Dublin, his family progressed from middle-class gentility to shabbiness as Joyce's profligate father failed at a series of jobs and business ventures and his mother underwent 16 pregnancies, producing a brood of 10 surviving children. His parents were both talented musicians, and Joyce, himself a gifted singer, remained deeply involved with music all his life. While acknowledging that he received a solid classical education at Jesuit schools, Joyce called the Jesuits "a heartless order," and by age 16 he was beginning to question the narrowness of Catholicism and to see himself as a writer who would need to transcend his repressive heritage. In 1902 he received a B.A. from University College in Dublin, in modern languages. At that point, he left for Paris, knowing instinctively that Ireland would be his subject matter but that, in order to write objectively about his homeland, he would have to live in exile. After a few brief visits to Ireland, he returned permanently to the continent in 1904 with Nora Barnacle, an uneducated Dublin girl he called his "portable Ireland." (Nora used to ask him, "Why don't you write books people can read?") The couple lived in Trieste, where Joyce taught English and wrote many of his major works, from 1904 until 1915. Eventually, they settled in Paris, remaining until 1940 (finally marrying in 1931 and producing two children), when they were forced by wartime necessity to evacuate to Switzerland. Joyce died there soon after, after an operation for a perforated ulcer. He was not quite 50 years old. Joyce was never financially solvent and relied on the assistance of patrons who believed in his genius. He was an expatriate most of his life, but as a writer he remained obsessed with Dublin, making the city a microcosm of all human experience. In the year 2000, Joyce's handwritten draft of the "Circe" chapter from ULYSSES sold at auction for $1.54 million--an ironic coda to the life of a writer who was perennially short of cash.

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