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Great Classic Science Fiction Eight Stories: Unabridged ( CD)

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Great Classic Science Fiction Wells, H. G./ Norton, Andre/ Weinbaum, Stanley G./ Del Rey, Lester/ Leiber, Fritz 1 of 1
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Learn more about Great Classic Science Fiction:

Format:  CD
ISBN-10: 1602838747
ISBN-13: 9781602838741
Sku: 212755387
Publish Date: 4/1/2010
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 6H x 5L x 1T
Pages:  5
 
The works of three masters of science fiction are gathered together for this new collection of classic stories.
From the Publisher:
An exciting grouping of classic science fiction short stories by various award-winning authors. Stories include: The Door in the Wall by H. G. Wells, A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum, Victory by Lester Del Rey, The Moon is Green by Fritz Leiber, The Winds of Time by James H. Schmitz, The Defenders by Philip K. Dick, Missing Link by Frank Herbert, and All Cats are Gray by Andre Norton.
Author Bio
Fritz Leiber
After graduating from the University of Chicago in 1932 with degrees in psychology and physiology, Fritz Leiber followed his father's footsteps by becoming an actor. After a few years, though, he left the world of acting, marrying Jonquil Stephens in 1936. Two years later, she gave birth to a son and, in 1939, Leiber published his first fantasy story, "Two Sought Adventure". This story began one of the most long-lived and acclaimed fantasy series of all adventures of Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser, also known as the Swords series. With this series, Leiber is credited with coining the term "swords and sorcery." Though working as an editor during the daytime, over the next ten years he wrote nearly 40 short stories and serials, including his first masterwork, CONJURE WIFE, published in novel form in 1953. In 1947, the influential publisher Arkham House collected many of his early stories under the title NIGHT'S BLACK AGENTS. The novel THE GREEN MILLENNIUM, about a mysterious green cat, was published in 1954. It was the first of many works by Leiber, an avowed cat-lover, to feature cats in important roles. 1958 was an important year for Leiber. "Lean Times in Lankhmar" was published, introducing Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser to a new generation, and he won the Hugo Award for THE BIG TIME, the first novel of his Changewar trilogy. It was also the year that he became a full-time writer. Leiber won further Hugos for a novel, THE WANDERER (1964), and a short story, "Gonna Roll the Bones" (1967), which also won a Nebula Award. The next year, the first two Swords books were published--a novel, SWORDS OF LANKHMAR, and a collection, SWORDS AGAINST WIZARDRY. These two books were extremely popular and became very influential to many future fantasy writers. When his wife died in 1969, Leiber went into an alcoholic depression that lasted several years, but he continued writing, producing another Hugo and Nebula winner, "Ill Met in Lankhmar", arguably his most well-known story. Moving to San Francisco, Leiber wrote the partly autobiographical novel, OUR LADY OF DARKNESS, and continued to write short stories, including award winners like "Belsen Express" (1975), "Catch that Zeppelin!" (1975), and "The Button Molder" (1979). In the 1980s, Leiber wrote less, but did continue the Swords series, with the KNIGHT & KNAVE OF SWORDS collection receiving several award nominations. He married longtime friend Margo Skinner in 1992, but, sadly, he died later that year. Before he died, Leiber had begun a large-scale effort to collect all of the Swords stories together, sequentially, and in revised and corrected versions. This project was completed posthumously, in the mid-1990s, and will serve to introduce yet more generations to Leiber's unique vision of fantasy.

Born in Kent, England to poor parents, H. G. Wells was apprenticed to a draper at age 14. Fired, he bounced from job to job, and at age 18 he went to college and became a pupil of scientist Thomas Henry Huxley, the greatest influence on his life. After two troubled marriages, Wells began publishing his novels and grew very wealthy; his first novel, THE TIME MACHINE, was followed by approximately a book a year. He was described by his paramour Rebecca West as "practically off his head, enormously vain, irascible, and in a fantasy world." He died in 1946, one month from his 80th birthday. His influence on other authors is incalculable.

Andre Norton is an extremely popular science fiction and fantasy author who has never received much critical attention. One reason may be that the majority of her work is written for (or marketed toward) children and young adults, markets which traditionally receive little "serious" coverage. Born in 1912 as Alice Mary, Norton went to work in the Cleveland Public Library system when she was 18, mainly in the children's section. After 11 years, she left to open a mystery bookstore, however, after a year she was back working at the library, where she remained for another nine years, until 1952. During this second stint at the library, she began to write and publish science fiction short stories, sometimes under the name Andrew North, although she had published non-genre stories as early as 1934. In 1952, her first novel, STAR MAN'S SON. 2250 A.D., was published under her own name. Returning to the "Andrew North" name, Norton then published the first three books in her first series, the Solar Queen cycle--the last three installments of which were written in the 1990s after a more than 20-year break. A prolific writer, Norton had written 19 books before she began what was to be her most well-known series: 1963s WITCH WORLD'S. As important as this book, and its sequels, were to thousands of readers, it was not until she was awarded Grand Master status from the World Fantasy Convention in 1987 that Norton received any major recognition from the science fiction community. One of her favorite themes, that of the need for cooperation between men and women, has set a benchmark for a genre that is all too often male-oriented to a fault. After more than 100 genre novels (and many non-genre ones), Norton's novels continue to bring this important notion to readers, whether they are children or adults.

Andre Norton was an extremely popular and prolific science fiction and fantasy author whose writing career spanned seven decades. Born in 1912 as Alice Mary Norton, she began working as a librarian when she was 18, and continued that career for 20 years, interrupted by a brief period working for the Library of Congress and then operating a mystery bookstore. Norton's writing career initially focused on historical and adventure fiction for juveniles; her first novel, THE PRINCE COMMANDS, was published in 1934. In that year, she legally changed her name to Andre, having been advised that a male-sounding name would be more appealing to her audience, which was presumed to be entirely male. 1952 saw the publication of her first science fiction novel, STAR MAN'S SON, 2250 A.D.(later retitled DAYBREAK: 2250 A.D.) Her first series was the Solar Queen cycle, the last three installments of which were written in the 1990s after a more than 20-year break. In 1963, she launched her most famous series, Witch World, with the novel of the same name; more than 30 sequels followed. Norton did not receive critical acclaim from her peers in the science fiction community until quite late in life, probably because her work was primarily marketed toward children and young adults. However, she was the first woman to win each of two prestigious awards for lifetime achievement: the Gandalf Grand Master, awarded by the World Science Fiction Society in 1977, and Grand Master, given to her by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) in 1983. In February, 2005, SFWA created a new award in her honor, the Andre Norton Award, to be presented to an outstanding fantasy or science fiction novel for young adults. Norton wrote or collaborated on over 100 genre novels (and many non-genre ones). She continued to write until nearly the end of her life, receiving a publisher's copy of her final solo-authored book, THREE HANDS FOR SCORPIO, just days before she died on March 16, 2005, in Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

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