Industrial Policy in the Middle East and North Africa : Rethinking the Role of the State (Paperback)

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Product Overview

Most governments in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region use trade policy to protect certain industries, provide tax incentives to promote a particular type of investment, and make subsidized credit available to firms of a certain size. Such government intervention, known as industrial policy, is the topic of this book. The aim is to assess whether state intervention leads to net benefits to society, why policymakers intervene, and how to bring about a healthier balance between states and markets. Answers to these questions are given in six chapters based on research papers that were presented at a conference held in Cairo in November 2005, and include case studies on Egypt, Morocco, Turkey, and Jordan.

Contributors: Hasan Ersel, Ahmed Galal, Najib Harabi, Nihal El Megharbel, Mustapha Nabli, and Marcus Noland.

An Egyptian Center for Economic Studies / World Bank Publication

Specifications

Publisher Amer Univ in Cairo Pr
Mfg Part# 9789774160509
SKU 203975518
Format Paperback
ISBN10 9774160509
Release Date 11/12/2012
Product Attributes
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