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International Justice and the International Criminal Court: Between Sovereignty and the Rule of Law Bruce Broomhall|Broomhall, Bruce 1 of 1
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Format: Hardcover
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Product Details:

Format: Hardcover
ISBN-10: 0199256004
ISBN-13: 9780199256006
Sku: 33768045
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 9.25H x 6.25L x 0.5T
Pages:  232
Edition Number:  2
 
Since the Nuremberg Trials of top Nazi leaders following the Second World War, international law has affirmed that no one, whatever their rank or office, is above accountability for their crimes. Yet the Cold War put geopolitical agendas ahead of effective action against war crimes and
major human rights abuses, and no permanent system to address impunity was put in place. It was only with the Cold War's end that governments turned again to international institutions to address impunity, first by establishing International Criminal Tribunals to prosecute genocide, war crimes
and crimes against humanity in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, and then by adopting the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court in 1998. Domestic courts also took a role, notably through extradition proceedings against former Chilean President Augusto Pinochet in London, then in
Belgium, Senegal, and elsewhere. At the same time, as some have announced a new era in the international community's response to atrocity, fundamental tensions persist between the immediate State interests and the demands of justice.
From the Publisher:
Since the Nuremberg Trials of top Nazi leaders following the Second World War, international law has affirmed that no one, whatever their rank or office, is above accountability for their crimes. Yet the Cold War put geopolitical agendas ahead of effective action against war crimes and major human rights abuses, and no permanent system to address impunity was put in place. It was only with the Cold War's end that governments turned again to international institutions to address impunity, first by establishing International Criminal Tribunals to prosecute genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, and then by adopting the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court in 1998. Domestic courts also took a role, notably through extradition proceedings against former Chilean President Augusto Pinochet in London, then in Belgium, Senegal, and elsewhere. At the same time, as some have announced a new era in the international community's response to atrocity, fundamental tensions persist between the immediate State interests and the demands of justice.
Product Attributes
Product attributeBook Format:   Hardcover
Product attributeEdition:   0002
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0232
Product attributePublisher:   Oxford University Press, USA
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