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Last Kiss (2006)

Director: Tony Goldwyn     Starring: Jacinda Barrett Zach Braff
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Description
 

Learn more about Last Kiss:

Format: DVD
Sku: 203366253
UPC: 097363464341
UPC 14: 00097363464341
Rating: Game Rating Code
See more in Drama
 
From the Writer of Million Dollar Baby and Co-Writer of Crash.
Anxieties threaten the future of a domesticated couple.

"The film marks Braff as a talent to watch, blessed with the sort of natural, everyman appeal that audiences eat up.  Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun
"...[Haggis] has turned the Italian romantic comedy "L'Ultimo Bacio" (2001) into something smarter, funnier, and more penetrating.  J.R. Jones, Chicago Reader
"...engages and pleases with its shaggy earnestness.  Shawn Levy, Portland Oregonian
"When it comes to exploring our peculiar blindness as to what's important in our lives, the film is a disturbing but accurate road map.  Connie Ogle, Miami Herald
"...with solid direction, tight writing and strong performances...[The Last Kiss is] an unusually perceptive dramedy about contemporary relationships...  Michael Rechtshaffen, The Hollywood Reporter

Editor's Note
Based on the Italian film L'ULTIMO BACIO and directed by Tony Goldwyn (A WALK ON THE MOON), THE LAST KISS is a film about growing pains and choices. Nearing his 30th birthday, marriage-phobic Michael (Zach Braff) loves his live-in girlfriend Jenna (Jacinda Barrett), but worries that there are no surprises left in his life. Enter Kim (Rachel Bilson), a vibrant college student Michael meets at a wedding. Soon, he finds himself treading in dangerous territory; he loves Jenna, but is intrigued by Kim and attracted to both her and to the possibilities that a new relationship offers. With Kim, Michael not only feels 10 years younger, but also as if anything is possible. Now, he has to decide if pursuing Kim is worth the risk of losing Jenna, and if the life he has planned with Jenna is in fact the life he really wants.

Michael, meanwhile, is not the only one experiencing growing pains; his friends have their own relationship issues. Izzy (Michael Weston) is battling heartbreak after being dumped by his longtime girlfriend. Chris (Casey Affleck) and his wife already have a rocky relationship, and are feeling the stress of having their first baby. Kenny (Eric Christian Olsen) is the only one without relationship issues--but that's only because he is determined to remain a single ladies' man. Then there are Jenna's parents, Anna (Blythe Danner) and Stephen (Tom Wilkinson), who are facing their own issues after 30 years of marriage. THE LAST KISS looks at relationships from all angles, and shies away from finger-pointing and laying blame. Instead, it acknowledges that the world is full of temptation, and that growing up is serious business. Braff does a nice job of conveying Michael's confusion without asking for sympathy.

Features

Video Features DVD, Widescreen, Rated R, English, Spanish, Dolby, Digital Audio, Dolby Digital (5.1), No Longer Produced

Technical Info


Release Information
Video Mfg Name Studio: Paramount
Video Release Date Release Date: 5/6/2008
Video Play Time Running Time: 103 minutes
Video Release Year Original Release Date: 2006
Video CategoryId Catalog ID: 346434
Video UPC UPC: 00097363464341
Video Number of Discs Number of Discs: 1

Audio & Video
Video Original Language Original Language: English
Video Audio Spec Available Audio Tracks: English [CC], English
Video Color Spec Video: Color

Aspect Ratio
Video Aspect Ratio Widescreen  2.35:1
Entertainment Reviews
Expert Review The Last Kiss (2006)
By: Sean O'Connell filmcritic.com DVD Reviews
Published on: 12/15/2006 8:42 PM
The catchy pop ballads found on the soundtrack for Tony Goldwyn's The Last Kiss will break your heart in two. The movie these songs support only wishes it could make such a claim....read the full review
Expert Review The Last Kiss
By: Rafe Telsch Cinema Blend DVD Reviews
Published on: 12/27/2006 10:14 AM
Frequently we go to the movies to escape the problems of the real world, but neither Haggis's script nor Goldwyn's direction aid in any sort of escapism. This is close to reality, placed on the screen as a window into these peoples' lives. It's not always funny and it's not always pretty, but it's real. If you, yourself are going through relationship crises, this is not the happy-go-lucky romantic comedy that's going to help you feel better or find any solutions. Life is tough and love is hard, and so is The Last Kiss...read the full review

Cast & Crew

Video Cast Info Blythe Danner
Video Cast Info Casey Affleck
Video Cast Info Eric Christian Olsen
Video Cast Info Harold Ramis
Video Cast Info Jacinda Barrett
Video Cast Info Rachel Bilson
Video Cast Info Tom Wilkinson
Video Cast Info Zach Braff
Video Cast Info Gabriele Muccino - Based On Screenplay By
Video Cast Info Lisa Zeno Churgin - Editor
Video Cast Info Michael Penn - Original Music By
Video Cast Info Paul Haggis - Screenplay
Video Cast Info Terry McKay - Executive Producer
Video Cast Info Tom Rosenberg - Producer
Video Cast Info Tom Stern - Cinematographer
Video Cast Info Tony Goldwyn - Director

Professional Reviews

Total Film
3 stars out of 5 -- "[T]he SCRUBS man is a star made, taking his easy GARDEN STATE charm and tagging on a thirtysomething maturity certain to make him a celluloid fixture for years. Rachel Bilson, too, makes giant strides..." 11/01/2006 p.48

Box Office
"An intelligent examination of dreams deferred....This film cuts pretty deep." 11/01/2006 p.118-119

Ultimate DVD
3 stars out of 5 -- "[A] decidedly adult and reflective look at the complex issues of love and commitment. Beautifully shot and with a great cast..." 03/01/2007 p.104

ReelViews 8 of 10
I recommend The Last Kiss, but not without a misgiving or two. This movie is essentially a celebration of yuppie angst. It's about people in their late 20s who have issues with commitment and monogamy, who have lost their way and are trying to find themselves. Essentially, it's about middle age crises for people who are only a little more than half-way to middle age. The protagonist is obnoxiously self-centered, yet we are supposed to sympathize with him and (at least based on the ending) forgive him for some of the crass things he does. Nevertheless, I liked The Last Kiss because, no matter how self-absorbed some of the characters are, they are three-dimensional. People will identify with them. Not all the stories have tidy endings. And there's some wonderful dialogue to go along with the exceptional performances. This is one of those movies where you're willing to overlook the flaws in order to appreciate what's worth lauding...Paul Haggis' screenplay is based on a 2001 Italian film named L'ultmo bacio, which I haven't seen. Like Crash, The Last Kiss seems more interested with cramming as many characters and situations into a reasonable running length than spending the time to delve beneath the surface...It seems that for every miss, there's an equal - if not stronger - hit. Haggis' dialogue is virtually without clunkers, and it is delivered with the appropriate weight by a solid cast. Braff's limp performance is countered by Barrett's emotional riveting one (although he's in more scenes than she is). The situations are interesting because the characters are real. Tony' Goldwyn's direction is sure-handed and the eclectic soundtrack will get many movie-goers surfing I-Tunes. For its core demographic, The Last Kiss has something to say, although it's fair to question how profound its words of wisdom are. - James Berardinelli

Variety 9 of 10
Reps of three generations in contempo Madison, Wis., grapple with commitment, infidelity, hot tempers and cold feet in "The Last Kiss." Nicely thesped and adequately involving narrative tackles issues well worth examining in a manner accessible to everyone...Haggis has sharply embellished a crucial dialogue scene between Braff's and Wilkinson's characters to excellent effect. A revelation and advice from an older man to a younger one leads to a rewardingly intense reshuffling of events en route to an open ending of a sort not often seen in mainstream American films. - Lisa Nesselson

The Onion A.V. Club 5 of 10
Tony Goldwyn's insufferable new drama The Last Kiss takes place in Madison, Wisconsin, a college town where midlife crises often begin in the mid-20s, and 29 can feel positively geriatric. So it makes sense that doe-eyed protagonist Zach Braff and his aimless pals would simultaneously run smack-dab into existential moments around their 30th birthdays. Unfortunately, nothing else about Tony Goldwyn's vapid, navel-gazing, claustrophobic adaptation of a 2001 Italian film rings remotely true...In a performance that consists largely of staring thoughtfully into space, Braff stars as a seemingly content architect whose perfect existence is rocked to the core by an affair with Rachel Bilson, a sexy undergraduate who symbolizes the seductive allure of eternal adolescence. The bad news about The Last Kiss is that the adorably chinless Braff comes off as whiny, self-pitying, and unlikeable. The worse news is that so does nearly everyone else...Paul Haggis penned Crash and Million Dollar Baby in addition to The Last Kiss, and while Kiss and Crash cover vastly different worlds, they both devolve into epic screaming matches devoid of nuance and complexity. With its thinly drawn characters and constant, hyperbolic conflict, The Last Kiss bears the unmistakable Haggis touch, one as subtle and understated as an electric chainsaw through the spinal cord. Of the large, wildly overqualified cast, only Tom Wilkinson, as the dry-witted father of Braff's gorgeous pregnant girlfriend (Jacinda Barrett), stands out, in part because he's the only character constitutionally averse to whining about his problems. Wilkinson's tight-lipped shrink is probably supposed to read as cold and distant, but after 104 sluggish minutes of yuppies screaming about their angst, stoicism and repression begin to look pretty damn appealing. - Nathan Rabin

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