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Lay Bare the Heart An Autobiography of the Civil Rights Movement (Paperback)

Author:  James Farmer Foreword By:  Don E. Carleton
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Description
 

Product Details:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0875651887
ISBN-13: 9780875651880
Sku: 30393088
Publish Date: 1/16/2003
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 9.25H x 6L x 1.25T
Pages:  370
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Texas native James Farmer is one of the "Big Four" of the turbulent 1960s civil fights movement, along with Martin Luther King, Jr., Roy Wilkins, and Whitney Young. Farmer might be called the forgotten man of the movement, overshadowed by Martin Luther King, Jr., who was deeply influenced by Farmer's interpretation of Gandhi's concept of nonviolent protest.

Born in Marshall, Texas, in 1920, the son of a preacher, Farmer grew up with segregated movie theaters and "White Only" drinking fountains. This background impelled him to found the Congress of Racial Equality in 1942. That same year he mobilized the first sit-in in an all-white restaurant near the University of Chicago. Under Farmer's direction, CORE set the pattern for the civil fights movement by peaceful protests which eventually led to the dramatic "Freedom Rides" of the 1960s.

In Lay Bare the Heart Farmer tells the story of the heroic civil fights struggle of the 1950s and 1960s. This moving and unsparing personal account captures both the inspiring strengths and human weaknesses of a movement beset by rivalries, conflicts and betrayals. Farmer recalls meetings with Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Jack and Bobby Kennedy, Adlai Stevenson (for whom he had great respect), and Lyndon Johnson (who, according to Farmer, used Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., to thwart a major phase of the movement).

James Farmer has courageously worked for dignity for all people in the United States. In this book, he tells his story with forthright honesty.

First published in 1985 by Arbor House, this edition contains a new foreword by Don Carleton, director of the Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin, and a new preface.

From the Publisher:
Texas native James Farmer is one of the "Big Four" of the turbulent 1960s civil fights movement, along with Martin Luther King, Jr., Roy Wilkins, and Whitney Young. Farmer might be called the forgotten man of the movement, overshadowed by Martin Luther King, Jr., who was deeply influenced by Farmer's interpretation of Gandhi's concept of nonviolent protest. Born in Marshall, Texas, in 1920, the son of a preacher, Farmer grew up with segregated movie theaters and "White Only" drinking fountains. This background impelled him to found the Congress of Racial Equality in 1942. That same year he mobilized the first sit-in in an all-white restaurant near the University of Chicago. Under Farmer's direction, CORE set the pattern for the civil fights movement by peaceful protests which eventually led to the dramatic "Freedom Rides" of the 1960s. In Lay Bare the Heart Farmer tells the story of the heroic civil fights struggle of the 1950s and 1960s. This moving and unsparing personal account captures both the inspiring strengths and human weaknesses of a movement beset by rivalries, conflicts and betrayals. Farmer recalls meetings with Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Jack and Bobby Kennedy, Adlai Stevenson (for whom he had great respect), and Lyndon Johnson (who, according to Farmer, used Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., to thwart a major phase of the movement). James Farmer has courageously worked for dignity for all people in the United States. In this book, he tells his story with forthright honesty. First published in 1985 by Arbor House, this edition contains a new foreword by Don Carleton, director of the Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin, and a new preface.
Product Attributes
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0370
Product attributePublisher:   Texas Christian University Press
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