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Love Is Like Park Avenue Levin, Alvin Frederick/ Reidel, James (EDT)/ Ashbery, John (FRW) 1 of 1
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Format: Paperback
Condition:  Brand New
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Product Details:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 081121799X
ISBN-13: 9780811217996
Sku: 209928219
Publish Date: 8/1/2009
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8.25H x 5.25L x 0.75T
Pages:  196
 
Alvin Levin, himself from the Bronx, captured life in the turbulent era of the 1930s in New York City. The stories are all told by and outsider artist, a writer who is never able to finish his long novel yet easily writes these small touching portraits about the poor who, in their dance halls and bars, long to live the high-life of the Park Avenue swells. in dance halls, and bars.
From the Publisher:
Collects stories, an unfinished novel, and sketches by the author--all of which focus on the part of 1930s New York society that lived in the Bronx, but longed to be in the shadow of skyscrapers--as well as the author's correspondence with encouraging publishers. Original.Collects stories, an unfinished novel, and sketches by the author--all of which focus on the part of 1930s New York society that lived in the Bronx, but longed to be in the shadow of skyscrapers--as well as the author's correspondence with encouraging publishers. Original.Alvin Levin, himself from the Bronx, captured life in the turbulent era of the 1930s in New York City. The stories are all told by and ?outsider artist?, a writer who is never able to finish his long novel yet easily writes these small touching portraits about the poor who, in their dance halls and bars, long to live the high-life of the Park Avenue ?swells.? in dance halls, and bars.
Annotation:
A long-forgotten literary voice who almost but never quite found success, Alvin Levin published numerous stories in The New Yorker and other prestigious magazines, evoking the voices and lives of down-and-out 1930s New Yorkers who lived in the shadow of the city's glimmering high life. Unable to finish his long novel, Levin eventually disappeared from the literary world. LOVE IS LIKE PARK AVENUE includes his published works, excerpts from his novel, and unpublished stories found in boxes after his death.
Author Bio
John Ashbery
Born and raised on a fruit farm in upstate New York, John Ashbery might not have become a poet if he had not won an anthology of poems in a grade-school contest. By his senior year at Deerfield Academy, the farmer's son conceived of himself as a writer and artist, and aspired to improve himself at Harvard, where he went to college. One of his classmates, the poet Kenneth Koch, became a close and lifelong friend, and the two of them attracted a noteworthy gathering of acquaintances and friends, including Frank O'Hara, James Schuyler, Barbara Guest, and others who eventually came to be known as the New York School poets. After writing a thesis on W. H. Auden, Ashbery graduated from Harvard in 1949 and attended Columbia for a master's degree. He then won a Fulbright to Paris where, in addition to developing a short-lived addiction to Coca-Cola, he worked on a never-finished book on the French writer Raymond Roussel, wrote poems, and took up art criticism, which would become, far a time, his primary occupation. He sent his first manuscript of poems, SOME TREES, to Yale University Press to be considered for their Yale Younger Poets Prize, and it was rejected in an early round of the selections. But Ashbery's thesis subject, W. H. Auden, was that year's final judge and was so disappointed with the poems Yale sent him that he asked for their rejects, and he chose Ashbery's manuscript from the slush pile. SOME TREES received only minor critical attention, so Ashbery tried something new and produced what is generally considered to be his most incomprehensible work, THE TENNIS COURT OATH. In spite of the work's difficulty, Ashbery's star began to rise, more and more quickly, and his quirky second book now looks less like a misstep than one of a series of feints in unconventional directions. After THE TENNIS COURT OATH, Ashbery made his living as an art critic, writing for the New York Herald Tribune while he was in Paris, then coming back to America to edit Art News and to write for Newsweek. His attitude toward reviewing was always somewhat ambivalent, as was his attitude to his other vocation, teaching, which he did mostly at Brooklyn College and Bard College in New York. The ambivalence Ashbery projected was long returned to him in spades by critics, who alternately adored and loathed his work, doing their best to shoehorn it into a recognizable tradition, only to be undone by Ashbery's next production. Nevertheless, he came by century's end to seem one of the great American poets, and he won many awards, including the Bollingen, the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and a MacArthur grant.
Product Attributes
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0196
Product attributePublisher:   New Directions Publishing Corporation
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