Quantity:
Ships from/sold by UnbeatableSale
Who's this?
Seller Rating:
advertisement

Mythologies (Paperback)

Earn Super Points: Write a Review
Sorry, this selection is currently unavailable.
Mythologies W. B. Yeats|Yeats, William Butler 1 of 1
$33.95
(Save 16%)
Today
$28.37 + $2.75 SHIPPING
EARN 29 RAKUTEN SUPER POINTS™ Super Points
What are Rakuten Super Points™?
Get rewarded when you shop! Earn 1 point per dollar spent. That's like getting cash back on every purchase. Easy to see matured points in checkout. Use points just like cash.
Learn More
Format: Paperback
Condition:  Brand New
In Stock: Usually Ships in 1 to 2 business days
View My Store
Share

Product Details:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 076614500X
ISBN-13: 9780766145009
Sku: 33798538
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 11H x 8.25L x 1T
Pages:  376
Age Range:  NA
See more in Folklore & Mythology
 
This is a collection of Irish stories of the supernatural and uncanny, based on country beliefs, traditions and folk tales. Contents: The Celtic Twilight; The Secret Rose; Stories of Red Hanrahan; Rosa Alchemica; Tables of the Law; Adoration of the Magi; and Per Amica Silentia Lunae. This book is essential for all the readers of Yeats poetry and plays. It reveals that Yeats could work unique enchantment in prose, as well as poetry. *Author: Yeats, William Butler *Binding Type: Paperback *Number of Pages: 376 *Publication Date: 2003/03/31 *Language: English *Dimensions: 11.00 x 8.25 x 0.78 inches
Author Bio
W B Yeats
It is generally agreed that Yeats is one of the great 20th-century poets; his poetry is marked by its integration of Irish myths with modern psychology. Born in Dublin in 1865, Yeats was the son of a painter and assumed that he too would make a career as an artist. However, he turned to poetry in his late teens, when he "lived, breathed, ate, drank and slept poetry." He lived in London from 1867 to 1883, but also spent a great deal of time in Ireland, particularly in County Sligo, which became an important landscape in his poetry. He became interested in the occult, an interest that culminated, later in life, in experiments with his wife (Georgina Hyde-Lees, whom he married in 1917) in automatic writing, which became the basis for many of his poems. Yeats was also a lifelong advocate of Irish nationalism, and much of his work includes elements of Irish tradition and history in an attempt to awaken his readers to the importance of the Irish spirit. His long devotion to the activist Maud Gonne (who married someone else in 1903) was another influence, inspiring a series of erotic and symbolic love poems. His association with the Abbey Theatre, for which he wrote patriotic plays, broadened his subject matter and his ambition, and after he met Ezra Pound in 1912, Yeats's poetry became tougher and less lyrical. In 1922 he was elected a senator of the Irish Free State, and in 1923 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature. In his last years, Yeats's politics became more conservative, and his poetry became more visionary and obscure. He continued to write until a few days before his death. His tombstone in Sligo bears lines from one of his last poems: "Cast a cold eye/On life, on death./ Horseman, pass by!"

It is generally agreed that Yeats is one of the great 20th-century poets; his poetry is marked by its integration of Irish myths with modern psychology. Born in Dublin in 1865, Yeats was the son of a painter and assumed that he too would make a career as an artist. However, he turned to poetry in his late teens, when he "lived, breathed, ate, drank and slept poetry." He lived in London from 1867 to 1883, but also spent a great deal of time in Ireland, particularly in County Sligo, which became an important landscape in his poetry. He became interested in the occult, an interest that culminated, later in life, in experiments with his wife (Georgina Hyde-Lees, whom he married in 1917) in automatic writing, which became the basis for many of his poems. Yeats was also a lifelong advocate of Irish nationalism, and much of his work includes elements of Irish tradition and history in an attempt to awaken his readers to the importance of the Irish spirit. His long devotion to the activist Maud Gonne (who married someone else in 1903) was another influence, inspiring a series of erotic and symbolic love poems. His association with the Abbey Theatre, for which he wrote patriotic plays, broadened his subject matter and his ambition, and after he met Ezra Pound in 1912, Yeats's poetry became tougher and less lyrical. In 1922 he was elected a senator of the Irish Free State, and in 1923 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature. In his last years, Yeats's politics became more conservative, and his poetry became more visionary and obscure. He continued to write until a few days before his death. His tombstone in Sligo bears lines from one of his last poems: "Cast a cold eye/On life, on death./ Horseman, pass by!"

Product Attributes
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0376
Product attributePublisher:   Kessinger Publishing
Advertisement Bottom
BloomReach Content