Never Forgotten (Hardcover)

Author: McKissack, Pat

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Product Overview

This gorgeous picture book by Newbery Honor winner Patricia C. McKissack and two-time Caldecott Medal-winning husband-and-wife team Leo and Diane Dillon is sure to become a treasured keepsake for African American families. Set in West Africa, here is a lyrical story-in-verse about a young black boy who is kidnapped and sold into slavery, which will remind children that their slave ancestors should never be forgotten, and that family is more important than anything else.

Specifications

Publisher Random House Childrens Books
Mfg Part# 9780375843846
SKU 219783317
Format Hardcover
ISBN10 0375843841
Release Date 10/11/2011
Physical
Dimensions (in Inches) 11.5H x 9.5L x 0.5T
Author Info
Leo Dillon
Leo Dillon was born 11 days earlier than his future wife and creative partner, Diane Worsley. He was raised in Brooklyn, New York by parents who were immigrants from Trinidad. Dillon attended the High School of Industrial Design, after which he enlisted in the U.S. Navy. When released from the Navy, he attended Parsons School of Design where he met Diane. The couple won the Caldecott Medal in 1975 for Verna Aardema's WHY MOSQUITOES BUZZ IN PEOPLE'S EARS: A WEST AFRICAN TALE. The next year they illustrated Margaret Musgrove's ASHANTI TO ZULU, for which they received their second Caldecott Medal. They were the first illustrators to win back-to-back Caldecotts.
Diane Worsley (later, Dillon) was born only 11 days after her future husband and collaborator, Leo Dillon. She attended Los Angles City College but dropped out after contracting tuberculosis. During her recovery, she had to live in a sanitarium where she spent most of her time reading, drawing, or knitting, as she could undergo no physical activity. After her recovery, she attended Skidmore College and then transferred to Parsons School of Design, where she met Leo Dillon. The couple won the Caldecott Medal in 1975 for Verna Aardema's WHY MOSQUITOES BUZZ IN PEOPLE'S EARS: A WEST AFRICAN TALE. The next year they illustrated Margaret Musgrove's ASHANTI TO ZULU, for which they received their second Caldecott Medal. They were the first illustrators to win back-to-back Caldecotts.
From the Publisher
Annotation Beautiful poems tell the story of a West African man and his son who are separated by the horror of slavery. A gifted Mende blacksmith, Dinga raises his motherless son with the help of the Mother Elements: Earth, Wind, Fire, and Water. When slave traders kidnap the boy, the Elements fail to save him. However, the Wind succeeds in finding out that Dinga's son is living in the New World enslaved, but alive and an accomplished blacksmith with hope for the future. With the stunning artwork of Leo and Diane Dillon, whose powerful watercolors resemble gorgeously rendered woodcuts.
Product Attributes
Book Format Hardcover
Minimum Age 09
Number of Pages 0048
Publisher Schwartz & Wade Books
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Format: Hardcover
Condition: Brand New
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