Plutarch's Lives : Demosthenes and Cicero, Alexander and Caesar (Hardcover)

Author: Plutarch

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Product Overview

Plutarch (Plutarchus), ca. AD 45– 120, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia in central Greece, studied philosophy at Athens, and, after coming to Rome as a teacher in philosophy, was given consular rank by the emperor Trajan and a procuratorship in Greece by Hadrian. He was married and the father of one daughter and four sons. He appears as a man of kindly character and independent thought, studious and learned.

Plutarch wrote on many subjects. Most popular have always been the 46 "Parallel Lives," biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs (in each pair, one Greek figure and one similar Roman), though the last four lives are single. All are invaluable sources of our knowledge of the lives and characters of Greek and Roman statesmen, soldiers and orators. Plutarch's many other varied extant works, about 60 in number, are known as "Moralia" or Moral Essays. They are of high literary value, besides being of great use to people interested in philosophy, ethics and religion.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of the "Lives" is in eleven volumes.

Specifications

Publisher Harvard Univ Pr
Mfg Part# 9780674991101
SKU 30115713
Format Hardcover
ISBN10 0674991109
Release Date 4/10/2007
Physical
Dimensions (in Inches) 6.75H x 4.5L x 1T
Author Info
Plutarch was born in Greece and stayed most of his life in his hometown of Chaeronea. Eventually, he traveled around the Mediterranean and settled in Rome, where he became a respected advocate of Greco-Roman compatibility. At around age 40, he became a priest at Delphi, where he remained until the end of his life. A philosopher and prolific writer, Plutarch is remembered by modern readers for his PARALLEL LIVES OF THE ROMANS & GREEKS, in which he paired historic figures from each culture, drawing moral lessons from them. His writings were very influential during the Renaissance, especially through a translation by the Frenchman Amyot. A version by Thomas North of Amyot's Plutarch is said to have been a source for Shakespeare in the writing of some of his plays. Thomas Dryden's translation is highly regarded and read, and Montaigne and Rousseau also cite Plutarch as an influence on their work.
From the Publisher
Annotation In this classic of historical biography, the first-century Greek writer pairs the life stories of Greek and Roman figures and draws moral lessons from their juxtaposition.
Editors Note Plutarch (Plutarchus), ca. 45?120 CE, was born at Chaeronea in Boeotia in central Greece, studied philosophy at Athens, and, after coming to Rome as a teacher in philosophy, was given consular rank by the emperor Trajan and a procuratorship in Greece by Hadrian. He was married and the father of one daughter and four sons. He appears as a man of kindly character and independent thought, studious and learned.Plutarch wrote on many subjects. Most popular have always been the 46 Parallel Lives, biographies planned to be ethical examples in pairs (in each pair, one Greek figure and one similar Roman), though the last four lives are single. All are invaluable sources of our knowledge of the lives and characters of Greek and Roman statesmen, soldiers and orators. Plutarch's many other varied extant works, about 60 in number, are known as Moralia or Moral Essays. They are of high literary value, besides being of great use to people interested in philosophy, ethics and religion.The Loeb Classical Library edition of the Lives is in eleven volumes.
Product Attributes
Book Format Hardcover
Number of Pages 0640
Publisher Harvard University Press
Series Part 099
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