Ships from/sold by Buy.com
See All Buying Options
advertisement

Samuel Pepys The Unequalled Self (Paperback)

Author:  Claire Tomalin
Earn Super Points: Write a Review
Sorry, this selection is currently unavailable.
Samuel Pepys Tomalin, Claire 1 of 1
$19.00
(Save 32%)
$12.81 + $3.75 SHIPPING
EARN 13 RAKUTEN SUPER POINTS™ Super Points
What are Rakuten Super Points™?
Get rewarded when you shop! Earn 1 point per dollar spent. That's like getting cash back on every purchase. Easy to see matured points in checkout. Use points just like cash.
Learn More
FORMAT: Paperback
CONDITION:  Brand New
IN STOCK: Usually Ships within 24 hours
Very few left In Stock! Order soon -- product may sell out.
3 New and Used
from
$12.81
See all sellers
45 day return policy
Share
 
Description
More Buying Options
 

Learn more about Samuel Pepys:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0375725539
ISBN-13: 9780375725531
Sku: 33851172
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8H x 5L x 1T
Pages:  465
Age Range:  NA
See more in Literary
 
Biography of diarist who lived through some of the most tumultuous events of British history.
From the Publisher:
For a decade, beginning in 1660, an ambitious young London civil servant kept an astonishingly candid account of his life during one of the most defining periods in British history. In Samuel Pepys, Claire Tomalin offers us a fully realized and richly nuanced portrait of this man, whose inadvertent masterpiece would establish him as the greatest diarist in the English language.

Against the backdrop of plague, civil war, and regicide, with John Milton composing diplomatic correspondence for Oliver Cromwell, Christopher Wren drawing up plans to rebuild London, and Isaac Newton advancing the empirical study of the world around us, Tomalin weaves a breathtaking account of a figure who has passed on to us much of what we know about seventeenth-century London. We witness Pepys’s early life and education, see him advising King Charles II before running to watch the great fire consume London, learn about the great events of the day as well as the most intimate personal details that Pepys encrypted in the Diary, follow him through his later years as a powerful naval administrator, and come to appreciate how Pepys’s singular literary enterprise would in many ways prefigure our modern selves. With exquisite insight and compassion, Samuel Pepys captures the uniquely fascinating figure whose legacy lives on more than three hundred years after his death.For ten years, from 1660, Samuel Pepys kept one of the most remarkable records ever made of a human life. With astounding candour and perceptiveness he described his ambitions and speculations, his professional success and failures, his pettinesses and meannesses, his tenderness towards his wife and the irritation and jealousies she provoked, his extramarital longings and fumblings, his coolly critical attitude towards the king he served and his watchful adaptation to the corrupt and treacherous society in which he lived.For a decade, beginning in 1660, an ambitious young London civil servant kept an astonishingly candid account of his life during one of the most defining periods in British history. In Samuel Pepys, Claire Tomalin offers us a fully realized and richly nuanced portrait of this man, whose inadvertent masterpiece would establish him as the greatest diarist in the English language.

Against the backdrop of plague, civil war, and regicide, with John Milton composing diplomatic correspondence for Oliver Cromwell, Christopher Wren drawing up plans to rebuild London, and Isaac Newton advancing the empirical study of the world around us, Tomalin weaves a breathtaking account of a figure who has passed on to us much of what we know about seventeenth-century London. We witness Pepys's early life and education, see him advising King Charles II before running to watch the great fire consume London, learn about the great events of the day as well as the most intimate personal details that Pepys encrypted in the Diary, follow him through his later years as a powerful naval administrator, and come to appreciate how Pepys's singular literary enterprise would in many ways prefigure our modern selves. With exquisite insight and compassion, Samuel Pepys captures the uniquely fascinating figure whose legacy lives on more than three hundred years after his death.
Annotation:
This biography of Samuel Pepys (1633-1703), the diarist and man-about-town in Restoration Era London, emphasizes his public and private lives, in particular his relationships (of all kinds) with women.

Praise

Atlantic Monthly
"Claire Tomalin's life...is a magnificent triumph. Her research has been not just scrupulously thorough but dazzlingly imaginative. The single most impressive thing about this fresh, serious book is that after finishing it, one suddenly reflects that at no moment did one ask the question that ought, surely to hang over any biography of Pepys: 'What is this really adding to what the DIARY tells us?...Here...we get the exhilarating sense that we were mistaken after all. Pepys did not, in fact, tell us everything...." - Philip Hensher November 2002

New Yorker
"In SAMUEL PEPYS: THE UNEQUALLED SELF, Tomalin gives us...a startling new way to read him....She displays in many spots a fine sense of humor, but she underestimates the component of sheer silliness in the diary....[R]eaders of Tomalin's book must not deny themselves the experience of going back to Pepys's diary almost immediately, before their experience of reading the biography has cooled down. The effects of the new book on the old are transformative." - Thomas Mallon 11/18/2002

New York Times
"Ms. Tomalin...has written the best work on Pepys since Robert Louis Stevenson's classic essay, published in 1881. Her writing is as supple and lively as Pepys's own, and by fleshing out the backdrop to his Diary writings, she has created the perfect bookend to his own rollicking self-portrait....In 1669..., Pepys put aside his Diary, leaving readers of his masterpiece suddenly stranded, with only parliamentary records, naval papers and occasional letters and notes to chart the rest of his life. Ms. Tomalin deftly fills in those remaining years, connecting the emotional dots while supplying the reader with the same compelling mix of the private and public, the momentous and trivial that animated Pepys's masterpiece." - Michiko Kakutani 12/13/2002

New York Times Book Review
"[T]he decline in Pepys's reputation only makes Claire Tomalin's engaging new biography all the more remarkable: she not only brings him back to violent life, but makes a powerful case that he's more central, more 'relevant,' than we ever imagined....Tomalin is a brilliant summarist, with a Pepys-like gift of her own for evoking the sights, sounds and smells of 17th-century London, and she has performed an invaluable service by so patiently and carefully sifting through mounds of documentation in order to bring us back the good stuff. She has restored to us the whole Pepys, not just the young man who wrote the diary, and we can now follow the full trajectory of his life...." - Charles McGrath 12/29/2002

Product Attributes

Product attributeeBooks:   Kobo
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0465
Product attributePublisher:   Vintage Books USA
Advertisement Bottom