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Shoah (Paperback)

Author:  Sue Vice
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FORMAT: Paperback
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Learn more about Shoah:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 1844573257
ISBN-13: 9781844573257
Sku: 216915766
Publish Date: 4/26/2011
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 7.5H x 5.5L x 0.25T
Pages:  98
 

Claude Lanzmann''s nine-and-a-half-hour 1985 epic "Shoah"--its title is the Hebrew word for "catastrophe"--is the distillation of more than 350 hours of film gathered over 11 years. It tells the story of the Holocaust through interviews with the survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. In 2000, the "Guardian" film critic Derek Malcolm called it "one of the most remarkable films ever made." It has also provoked debates about the very possibility of Holocaust representation. Sue Vice provides a devoted study of the film, discussing the problematic role of Lanzmann as the director and the numerous controversies and conclusions that "Shoah "has produced. Some of the topics she covers are: Lanzmann as filmmaker, mise-en-scene, Lanzmann as interviewer, the ethics of filming, testimony, and more.

From the Publisher:

Claude Lanzmann’s nine-and-a-half-hour 1985 epic Shoah—its title is the Hebrew word for “catastrophe”—is the distillation of more than 350 hours of film gathered over 11 years. It tells the story of the Holocaust through interviews with the survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. In 2000, the Guardian film critic Derek Malcolm called it “one of the most remarkable films ever made.” It has also provoked debates about the very possibility of Holocaust representation. Sue Vice provides a devoted study of the film, discussing the problematic role of Lanzmann as the director and the numerous controversies and conclusions that Shoah has produced. Some of the topics she covers are: Lanzmann as filmmaker, mise-en-scène, Lanzmann as interviewer, the ethics of filming, testimony, and more.

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