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Silent Honor (Paperback)

Author:  Danielle Steel
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Silent Honor Steel, Danielle 1 of 1
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Learn more about Silent Honor:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0440224055
ISBN-13: 9780440224051
Sku: 30067347
Publish Date: 10/1/1997
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 6.5H x 4L x 1T
Pages:  416
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A Japanese girl living with her uncle in California to attend college, Hiroko becomes caught up in the horrors of World War II after the bombing of Pearl Harbor when she and her uncles family are forced into an internment camp with other Japanese Americans *Author: Steel, Danielle *Publication Date: 1997/10/01 *Binding Type: Paperback *Language: English *Depth: 1.00 *Width: 4.00 *Height: 6.50
From the Publisher:
In her 38th bestselling novel, Danielle Steel creates a powerful, moving portrayal of families divided, lives shattered and a nation torn apart by prejudice during a shameful episode in recent American history.A man ahead of his time, Japanese college professor Masao Takashimaya of Kyoto had a passion for modern ideas that was as strong as his wifes belief in ancient traditions. It was the early 1920s and Masao had dreams for the future--and a fascination with the politics and opportunities of a world that was changing every day. Twenty years later, his eighteen-year-old daughter Hiroko, torn between her mothers traditions and her fathers wishes, boarded the SS Nagoya Maru to come to California for an education and to make her father proud. It was August 1941.From the ship, she went directly to the Palo Alto home of her uncle, Takeo, and his family. To Hiroko, California was a different world--a world of barbeques, station wagons and college. Her cousins in California had become more American than Japanese. And much to Hirokos surprise, Peter Jenkins, her uncles assistant at Stanford, became an unexpected link between her old world and her new. But in spite of him, and all her promises to her father, Hiroko longs to go home. At college in Berkeley, her world is rapidly and unexpectedly filled with prejudice and fear.On December 7, Pearl Harbor is bombed by the Japanese. Within hours, war is declared and suddenly Hiroko has become an enemy in a foreign land. Terrified, begging to go home, she is nonetheless ordered by her father to stay. He is positive she will be safer in California than at home, and for a brief time she is--until her entire world caves in.On February 19, Executive Order 9066 is signed by President Roosevelt, giving the military the power to remove the Japanese from their communities at will. Takeo and his family are given ten days to sell their home, give up their jobs, and report to a relocation center, along with thousands of other Japanese and Japanese Americans, to face their destinies there. Families are divided, people are forced to abandon their homes, their businesses, their freedom, and their lives. Hiroko and her uncles family go first to Tanforan, and from there to the detention center at Tule Lake. This extraordinary novel tells what happened to them there, creating a portrait of human tragedy and strength, divided loyalties and love. It tells of Americans who were treated as foreigners in their own land. And it tells Hiroko's story, and that of her American family, as they fight to stay alive amid the drama of life and death in the camp at Tule Lake. With clear, powerful prose, Danielle Steel portrays not only the human cost of that terrible time in history, but also the remarkable courage of a people whose honor and dignity transcended the chaos that surrounded them. Set against a vivid backdrop of war and change, her thirty-eighth bestselling novel is both living history and outstanding fiction, revealing the stark truth about the betrayal of Americans by their own government...and the triumph of a woman caught between cultures and determined to survive.Danielle Steel's 38th novel creates a moving portrayal of families divided, lives shattered, and a nation torn apart by prejudice during a shameful period in recent American history. On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, giving the military the power to remove Japanese-Americans from their communities at will. "Silent Honor" tells of Masao Takashimaya and his family, as they fight to stay alive amid the drama of life and death in the internment camp at Tule Lake.
Annotation:
"Silent Honor" marks new ground for Steele, who travels to Japan for this period love story set largely in the 1940's. Married by arrangement, a Japanese couple fall in love despite their differences: she's a traditionalist, he's progressive. When their daughter turns 18, she is sent to study in America, where the love she finds with a young American is complicated by the onset of World War II.
Author Bio
Danielle Steel
Educated in both France and New York, Danielle Steel began publishing in 1981 after a successful career in public relations and advertising. Her ensuing string of bestsellers earned her a mention in the "Guiness Book of World Records" for the 390 consecutive weeks during which at least one of her books could be found on the New York Times Bestseller List. Steel writes mostly contemporary romances with recurring themes of family, trust, and the search for true love. Steel has been married numerous times and has had a total of nine children. After her son Nick died of a drug overdose, Steel wrote "His Bright Light" (1998), a non-fiction account of his promising life and tragic death. In addition to having served as the National Chairperson for the American Library Association, she has acted as spokesperson for both the National Committee for the Prevention of Child Abuse and the American Humane Association. Steel spends part of each year at her Napa Valley ranch across the road from Francis Ford Coppola's estate. Her numerous pets have included a Vietnamese potbellied pig called Coco, named after Steel's favorite fashion designer, Coco Chanel.

Praise

Kirkus Reviews
"...Well-researched and solid in its basis." 10/01/1996

Product Attributes

Product attributeeBooks:   Kobo
Product attributeBook Format:   Pocketbook
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0416
Product attributePublisher:   Dell Publishing Company
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