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Six Not-So-Easy Pieces Einstein's Relativity, Symmetry and Space-Time (Paperback)

Author:  Richard Phillips Feynman Introduction:  Roger Penrose
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Learn more about Six Not-So-Easy Pieces:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0201328410
ISBN-13: 9780201328417
Sku: 30274305
Publish Date: 4/16/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8.25H x 5.5L x 1T
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The spectacular reception of the book and audio versions of Feynman''s "Six Easy Pieces" (published in 1995) resulted in a worldwide clamor for "More Feynman! More Feynman!" The outcome is these six additional lectures, drawn from the celebrated three-volume "Lectures on Physics." Though slightly more challenging than the first six, these lectures are more focused, delving into the most revolutionary discovery in twentieth-century physics: Einstein''s Theory of Relativity.
From the Publisher:
"In these lectures, everything you've ever heard about Feynman's wit and genius comes through". -- John Horgan, author of The End of Science. "Want to really understand why time slows, mass increases and length contracts as something approaches light speed, why space has just got to be curved and why it is not only impossible to predict the future, but actually there is no fortune teller who can even tell us the present?' ... Sure this is hard stuff -- the cerebral equivalent of high-impact aerobics...but there is no better explanation for the scientifically literate layman...Just do it". -- The Washington Post Book World
No twentieth-century American scientist is better known to a wider spectrum of people than Richard P. Feynman (1918?1988)?physicist, teacher, author, and cultural icon. His autobiographies and biographies have been read and enjoyed by millions of readers around the world, while his wit and eccentricities have made him the subject of TV specials and even a theatrical film.The spectacular reception of the book and audio versions of Feynman?s Six Easy Pieces (published in 1995) resulted in a worldwide clamor for ?More Feynman! More Feynman!? The outcome is these six additional lectures, drawn from the celebrated three-volume Lectures on Physics. Though slightly more challenging than the first six, these lectures are more focused, delving into the most revolutionary discovery in twentieth-century physics: Einstein?s Theory of Relativity.No single breakthrough in twentieth-century physics (with the possible exception of quantum mechanics) changed our view of the world more than that of Einstein?s discovery of relativity. The notions that the flow of time is not a constant, that the mass of an object depends on its velocity, and that the speed of light is a constant no matter what the motion of the observer, at first seemed shocking to scientists and laymen alike. But, as Feynman shows so clearly and so entertainingly in the lectures chosen for this volume, these crazy notions are no mere dry principles of physics, but are things of beauty and elegance. No one?not even Einstein himself?explained these difficult, anti-intuitive concepts more clearly, or with more verve and gusto, than Richard Feynman.
Author Bio
Richard P Feynman
Richard Feynman, an American theoretical physicist, attended M.I.T. in 1936 where he graduated with a B.S. degree in 1939. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1942 and during this time he married the girl of his dreams, Arlene Greenbaum. She later died of tuberculosis in 1945. At the age of 24 he was brought in to work on the top-secret Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, New Mexico. From 1945 to 1950, he taught at Cornell University and became a professor of theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology in 1950. In 1952, Feynman married Mary Louise Bell but their marriage ended in divorce in 1956. Four years later he married Gweneth Howarth and with her they had a son, Carl, and adopted a daughter, Michelle. During the early sixties he taught an introductory physics course at CalTech and recorded his lectures. From these lectures a series of three books were published, and were entitled "The Feynman Lectures on Physics", a standard in most undergraduate courses in physics. In 1965 he was one of the recipients of the Nobel Prize for physics. Throughout the 1970s Feynman spent most of his time working on high energy physics. The 1980s saw Richard Feynman as an outspoken public figure and after the 1982 Challenger space shuttle disaster, he openly criticized NASA for its failure to notice flaws in its design. He died in 1998 of stomach cancer.

Richard Feynman, an American theoretical physicist, attended M.I.T. in 1936 where he graduated with a B.S. degree in 1939. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1942 and during this time he married the girl of his dreams, Arlene Greenbaum. She later died of tuberculosis in 1945. At the age of 24 he was brought in to work on the top-secret Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, New Mexico. From 1945 to 1950, he taught at Cornell University and became a professor of theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology in 1950. In 1952, Feynman married Mary Louise Bell but their marriage ended in divorce in 1956. Four years later he married Gweneth Howarth and with her they had a son, Carl, and adopted a daughter, Michelle. During the early sixties he taught an introductory physics course at CalTech and recorded his lectures. From these lectures a series of three books were published, and were entitled "The Feynman Lectures on Physics", a standard in most undergraduate courses in physics. In 1965 he was one of the recipients of the Nobel Prize for physics. Throughout the 1970s Feynman spent most of his time working on high energy physics. The 1980s saw Richard Feynman as an outspoken public figure and after the 1982 Challenger space shuttle disaster, he openly criticized NASA for its failure to notice flaws in its design. He died in 1998 of stomach cancer.

Product Attributes

Product attributeBook Format:   Audio Cassette - Unabridged
Product attributePublisher:   Basic Books (AZ)
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