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Sons and Lovers (Paperback)

Author:  D. H. Lawrence
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Format: Paperback Large Print
ISBN-10: 1847022472
ISBN-13: 9781847022479
Sku: 202721560
Publish Date: 3/26/2012
Pages:  516
Age Range:  NA
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"The Bottoms" succeeded to "Hell Row." (from the first line)
This large print title is set in Tieras 16pt font as reccomended by the RNIB.
Annotation:
Based very closely on D.H. Lawrence's own life, SONS AND LOVERS (1913) tells the story of young Paul Morel, son of the troubled union of an educated, upwardly mobile mother and an ill-tempered, unlettered coal miner father who speaks in a broad dialect. Although in later life Lawrence regretted his brutal portrait of his father, the hero of the novel is most definitely his mother's boy, becoming increasingly dissatisfied with his mean, impoverished home in a Nottinghamshire coal town. He is drawn to a young woman named Miriam (based on Lawrence's old flame Jessie Chambers), with whom he reads poetry and speaks French; his voracious mother fears that Paul's attraction to Miriam will jeopardize her own relationship with him, and does everything she can to come between them. Paul then begins an affair with Clara, a married woman and a feminist. In the end, Paul finds the resolution to reject his background for good; knowing he must forget both Miriam and Clara, he sets out with renewed resolution on a quest for a life of his own. Unique for its sexual frankness and working-class background, SONS AND LOVERS is Lawrence's first major achievement, and a groundbreaking step forward in the history of English realistic fiction.Based very closely on D.H. Lawrence's own life, SONS AND LOVERS (1913) tells the story of young Paul Morel, son of the troubled union of an educated, upwardly mobile mother and an ill-tempered, unlettered coal miner father who speaks in a broad dialect. Although in later life Lawrence regretted his brutal portrait of his father, the hero of the novel is most definitely his mother's boy, becoming increasingly dissatisfied with his mean, impoverished home in a Nottinghamshire coal town. He is drawn to a young woman named Miriam (based on Lawrence's old flame Jessie Chambers), with whom he reads poetry and speaks French; his voracious mother fears that Paul's attraction to Miriam will jeopardize her own relationship with him, and does everything she can to come between them. Paul then begins an affair with Clara, a married woman and a feminist. In the end, Paul finds the resolution to reject his background for good; knowing he must forget both Miriam and Clara, he sets out with renewed resolution on a quest for a life of his own. Unique for its sexual frankness and working-class background, SONS AND LOVERS is Lawrence's first major achievement, and a groundbreaking step forward in the history of English realistic fiction.
Author Bio
D. H. Lawrence
Lawrence was the son of an uneducated miner and a genteel, resentful mother who wanted better lives for her children. He educated himself through scholarships and worked as an elementary schoolteacher from 1902 to 1906. He began publishing poetry in the "English Review" in 1909, and in 1910 published his first short story and a novel. Two years later, he fell in love with Frieda von Richthofen, the German wife of a Nottingham French professor, and fled to Germany with her, where they were married in 1914 after her divorce. When World War I broke out, they returned to England. Violently opposed to the war, Lawrence left England for good when it was over and lived the rest of his life in Italy, Australia, Mexico, and the south of France, where he finally succumbed to tuberculosis at the age of 44. In addition to novels, Lawrence in his brief life wrote dozens of short stories; vivid and visionary poems; criticism; and several books about his extensive travels. Lawrence's novels were considered revolutionary in their time because of their intimate and unsparing exploration of human life and sexuality. "The Rainbow" was suppressed for indecency in 1915, and "Lady Chatterly's Lover" was banned in 1928.

Lawrence was the son of an uneducated miner and a genteel, resentful mother who wanted better lives for her children. He educated himself through scholarships and worked as an elementary schoolteacher from 1902 to 1906. He began publishing poetry in the "English Review" in 1909, and in 1910 published his first short story and a novel. Two years later, he fell in love with Frieda von Richthofen, the German wife of a Nottingham French professor, and fled to Germany with her, where they were married in 1914 after her divorce. When World War I broke out, they returned to England. Violently opposed to the war, Lawrence left England for good when it was over and lived the rest of his life in Italy, Australia, Mexico, and the south of France, where he finally succumbed to tuberculosis at the age of 44. In addition to novels, Lawrence in his brief life wrote dozens of short stories; vivid and visionary poems; criticism; and several books about his extensive travels. Lawrence's novels were considered revolutionary in their time because of their intimate and unsparing exploration of human life and sexuality. "The Rainbow" was suppressed for indecency in 1915, and "Lady Chatterly's Lover" was banned in 1928.

Praise

"To read 'Sons and Lovers' as Lawrence wrote it is a revelation. The Cambridge edition is a masterly work of scholarship." - Anthony Burgess

"No other writer with his imaginative standing has in our time written books that are so open to life." - Alfred Kazin

New York Times Book Review
"The book is full of short, vivid descriptions....Each is a picture drawn in a sentence. Although this is a Novel of over 500 closely printed pages the style is terse--so terse that at times it produces an effect as of short, sharp hammer strokes. Yet it is flexible, too, as shown by its success in depicting varying shades of mood, in expressing those more intimate emotions which are so nearly inexpressible." 09/21/1913

"It is not good enough to spend time and ink in describing the penultimate sensations and physical movements of people getting into a state of rut..." - John Galsworthy 04/13/1914

"The closeness and richness of experience that comes fizzing out of words and pages...absorbs one here...the genius of people, place and language is more vivid and compelling than ever." - John Bayley

"The closeness and richness of experience that comes fizzing out of words and pages...absorbs one here...the genius of people, place and language is more vivid and compelling than ever." - John Bayley

"It is not good enough to spend time and ink in describing the penultimate sensations and physical movements of people getting into a state of rut..." - John Galsworthy 04/13/1914

New York Times Book Review
"The book is full of short, vivid descriptions....Each is a picture drawn in a sentence. Although this is a Novel of over 500 closely printed pages the style is terse--so terse that at times it produces an effect as of short, sharp hammer strokes. Yet it is flexible, too, as shown by its success in depicting varying shades of mood, in expressing those more intimate emotions which are so nearly inexpressible." 09/21/1913

"No other writer with his imaginative standing has in our time written books that are so open to life." - Alfred Kazin

"To read 'Sons and Lovers' as Lawrence wrote it is a revelation. The Cambridge edition is a masterly work of scholarship." - Anthony Burgess

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