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Terror and the Uncanny from Poe to the Pulps Straub, Peter (EDT) 1 of 1
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Learn more about Terror and the Uncanny from Poe to the Pulps:

Format: Hardcover
ISBN-10: 159853047X
ISBN-13: 9781598530476
Sku: 211305525
Publish Date: 8/5/2009
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8.5H x 5.5L x 1.25T
Pages:  746
See more in Horror
 
Straub, a contemporary master of literary horror and fantasy, offers an authoritative and diverse gathering of stories calculated to unsettle and delight. Ghostly narratives of the Edwardian era, lurid classics from the pulp heyday, and modern-day masterpieces are included in these collections.
From the Publisher:
From early on, American literature has teemed with tales of horror, of hauntings, of terrifying obsessions and gruesome incursions, of the uncanny ways in which ordinary reality can be breached and subverted by the unknown and the irrational. As this pathbreaking two-volume anthology demonstrates, it is a tradition with many unexpected detours and hidden chambers, and one that continues to evolve, finding new forms and new themes as it explores the bad dreams that lurk around the edges--if not in the unacknowledged heart--of the everyday. Peter Straub, one of today's masters of horror and fantasy, offers an authoritative and diverse gathering of stories calculated to unsettle and delight.||This first volume surveys a century and a half of American fantastic storytelling, revealing in its 44 stories an array of recurring themes: trance states, sleepwalking, mesmerism, obsession, possession, madness, exotic curses, evil atmospheres. In the tales of Irving, Poe, and Hawthorne, the bright prospects of the New World face an uneasy reckoning with the forces of darkness. In the ghost-haunted Victorian and Edwardian eras, writers including Henry James, Edith Wharton, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Ambrose Bierce explore ever more refined varieties of spectral invasion and disintegrating selfhood.||In the twentieth century, with the arrival of the era of the pulps, the fantastic took on more monstrous and horrific forms at the hands of H. P. Lovecraft, Robert E. Howard, Robert Bloch, and other classic contributors to Weird Tales. Here are works by acknowledged masters such as Stephen Crane, Willa Cather, Conrad Aiken, and F. Scott Fitzgerald, along with surprising discoveries like Ralph Adams Cram's "The Dead Valley," Emma Francis Dawson's "An Itinerant House," and Julian Hawthorne's "Absolute Evil."||American Fantastic Tales offers an unforgettable ride through strange and visionary realms.A first volume in a two-part anthology edited by a leading contemporary author is an authoritative treasury of horror tales from the Edwardian era through the pulp heyday of Weird Tales.
Author Bio
Peter Straub
The events of Peter Straub's childhood--including teaching himself to read in kindergarten, being involved in a car accident in first grade that left him in a wheelchair for a time, and developing a stutter that lasted until his 20s--conspired to give him something of a dislike for school. So after graduating with an M.A. from Columbia University in 1966, he did what anyone in a similar situation would have done: He became an English teacher at the very school he attended in Milwaukee. In 1969 he moved with his wife to Dublin, Ireland, to study for a Ph.D. There he began to write poetry, publishing two collections prior to his first novel, MARRIAGES, in 1973. Now living in London, Straub's work began to take a turn toward horror with JULIA and IF YOU COULD SEE ME NOW--both about malevolent ghosts. But Straub didn't really hit the big time until 1979's GHOST STORY--about a group of elderly men whose regular ghost story-telling sessions become the target of a ghostly revenge--became a huge bestseller. The film version, made in 1981, featured among its extraordinary cast Fred Astaire (who was 82) and Melvyn Douglas (who was 80) in their last roles, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. (at 72) in his penultimate role, and John Houseman (who was 79). After the success of GHOST STORY, Straub wrote SHADOW LAND and FLOATING DRAGON, before his 1984 collaboration with Stephen King, THE TALISMAN. After this, Straub began to slowly move away from the fantastic, all the while remaining a bestselling author. KOKO, the first book in a trilogy, was about a group of Vietnam vets hunting a killer. Like MYSTERY and THE THROAT--the other books in the trilogy--it focused more on mystery and detective themes, retaining only the barest of horror elements. With 1996's HELLFIRE CLUB, Straub finally jettisoned horror altogether, focusing on the complex relationship between an escaped psychopathic killer and his hostage. Averaging one book every three years or so, Straub is not the most prolific of authors, but, perhaps because of this, he is one of the most critically well-regarded best-selling genre writers.

The events of Peter Straub's childhood--including teaching himself to read in kindergarten, being involved in a car accident in first grade that left him in a wheelchair for a time, and developing a stutter that lasted until his 20s--conspired to give him something of a dislike for school. So after graduating with an M.A. from Columbia University in 1966, he did what anyone in a similar situation would have done: He became an English teacher at the very school he attended in Milwaukee. In 1969 he moved with his wife to Dublin, Ireland, to study for a Ph.D. There he began to write poetry, publishing two collections prior to his first novel, MARRIAGES, in 1973. Now living in London, Straub's work began to take a turn toward horror with JULIA and IF YOU COULD SEE ME NOW--both about malevolent ghosts. But Straub didn't really hit the big time until 1979's GHOST STORY--about a group of elderly men whose regular ghost story-telling sessions become the target of a ghostly revenge--became a huge bestseller. The film version, made in 1981, featured among its extraordinary cast Fred Astaire (who was 82) and Melvyn Douglas (who was 80) in their last roles, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. (at 72) in his penultimate role, and John Houseman (who was 79). After the success of GHOST STORY, Straub wrote SHADOW LAND and FLOATING DRAGON, before his 1984 collaboration with Stephen King, THE TALISMAN. After this, Straub began to slowly move away from the fantastic, all the while remaining a bestselling author. KOKO, the first book in a trilogy, was about a group of Vietnam vets hunting a killer. Like MYSTERY and THE THROAT--the other books in the trilogy--it focused more on mystery and detective themes, retaining only the barest of horror elements. With 1996's HELLFIRE CLUB, Straub finally jettisoned horror altogether, focusing on the complex relationship between an escaped psychopathic killer and his hostage. Averaging one book every three years or so, Straub is not the most prolific of authors, but, perhaps because of this, he is one of the most critically well-regarded best-selling genre writers.

Praise

"A terrific, must-have collection." 10/01/2009
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