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Author:  G. K./ Adair Chesterton Foreword By:  Gilbert Adair
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The Club of Queer Trades Chesterton, G. K./ Adair, Gilbert (FRW) 1 of 1
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Description
 

Product Details:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 1843914344
ISBN-13: 9781843914341
Sku: 204552805
Publish Date: 8/13/2012
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 7.5H x 4.75L x 0.5T
Pages:  149
Age Range:  NA
 
Published here with his essay "A Defence of Detective Stories," this witty and hugely enjoyable work was Chesterton's first foray into detective fiction. Set in late Victorian London, "The Club of Queer Trades" introduces us to would-be private detective Rupert Grant and his brother, the outlandish and seemingly insane retired judge, Basil, who is in fact by far the more astute of the two. They undertake a series of bizarre and improbable cases that see them dealing with various eccentric characters, including a Major receiving a very odd death threat and a trapped woman who refuses to be rescued. As their cases mount up, it becomes clear that all the investigations are linked to the enigmatic Club of Queer Trades.
Annotation:
A whimsical story cycle originally published in 1905. Each tale concerns a man who has developed a completely new and different way to make a living, such as the head of the Adventure and Romance Agency, who provides adventure and romance to everyday people; and a Professional Detainer, who is hired to make people late.
Author Bio
G. K. Chesterton
Despite the fact that he authored over 100 books, Chesterton considered himself to be primarily a journalist, and he wrote thousands of articles for London newspapers and magazines. With an enormous body of non-fiction writing in his oeuvre, Chesterton wrote fearlessly and with great passion on matters of religion, philosophy, politics, and modern social issues. He was considered by many of his peers, including George Bernard Shaw, to be a man of great genius. But Chesterton is most popularly known as an author of mysteries--the Father Brown series, "The Man Who Was Thursday", "The Man Who Knew Too Much", among others. An admirer of Poe and Dickens, Chesterton in turn influenced such authors as John Dickson Carr, Jorge Luis Borges, Kingsley Amis, and Dorothy H. Sayers.

Praise

(unknown)
"A reading of Chesterton reinforces the truth that the best detective stories are written by artists and not artisans." - Julian Symons

New York Times
"Funmaking of the most fantastic kind characterizes the six short stories." 05/20/1905

Armchair Detective
"Although virtually unknown today, 'The Club of Queer Trades' (1904), which predated the first Father Brown story by six years, was Chesterton's first attempt to put his theories of the detective story into practice....The policeman or detective is a modern knight-errant, protecting society from chaos, inferring from the 'hieroglyphs' of every stone, brick and signpost the revelation of some great secret that will astonish the reader. At the same time, warned Chesterton, the mere accumulation of clues can become a sterile, self-defeating process, which, bereft of psychological insight and philosophical acumen, too often leads the investigator astray." - John C. Tibbetts Fall 1995

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