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Author:  Charles M. Schulz Introduction:  Garrison Keillor
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The Complete Peanuts 1950-1954 Schulz, Charles M. 1 of 1
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FORMAT: Hardcover
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CONDITION:  Brand New
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Description
 

Learn more about The Complete Peanuts 1950-1954:

Format: Hardcover
ISBN-10: 1560976322
ISBN-13: 9781560976325
Sku: 36411081
Publish Date: 10/30/2004
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8.75H x 7.25L x 2.75T
Pages:  704
Age Range:  14 to 19
 
The Complete Peanuts 1950-1952
Fantagraphics Books has announced the most exciting publishing project in the history of the American comic strip: the complete reprinting of Charles M. Schulz's classic, "Peanuts." The most popular comic strip in the history of the world will be, for the first time, collected in its entirety with this new publication.

The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954
This second volume begins with Peanuts' third full year and a cast of eight: Charlie Brown, Shermy, Patty, Violet, Schroeder, Lucy, Snoopy, and the recently born Linus, who begins to emerge as the most complex and arguably most endearing character in the strip.

From the Publisher:
A boxed set of the first two volumes, just in time for the holidays, designed by the Award-winning graphic novelist, Seth! Ships shrinkwrapped.|The first volume, The Complete Peanuts 1950-1952, covers the first two and a quarter years of the strip (October 1950 through December 1952), and will be of particular fascination to Peanuts aficionados worldwide: Although there have been literally hundreds of Peanuts books published, many of the strips from the series' first two or three years have never been collected before—in large part because they showed a young Schulz working out the kinks in his new strip and include some characterizations and designs that are quite different from the cast we're all familiar with (Among other things, three major cast members—Schroeder, Lucy, and Linus—initially show up as infants and only "grow" into their final "mature" selves as the months go by. Even Snoopy debuts as a puppy!).|The second volume, The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954, begins with Peanuts' third full year and a cast of eight: Charlie Brown, Shermy, Patty, Violet, Schroeder, Lucy, the recently born Linus, and Snoopy. By the end of 1954, this will have expanded to nine. Linus still doesn't speak (except, on a few occasions, to himself, à la Snoopy), but Schulz begins laying the foundation for his emergence as the most complex and arguably most endearing character in the strip: garrulous and inquisitive, yet gentle and tolerant. And he evens acquires his "security blanket" in this volume! Meanwhile, Lucy, an infant just a year ago, has forcefully elbowed herself to the front of the cast, proudly wearing her banner as a troublemaker or, in Schulz's memorable phrase, "fuss-budget." The strong, specific relationships she sets up with each character further contributes to making her central to the strip. (She has earned her cover status on this volume.) This period's significant new character is Pig-Pen, who would remain one of the main cast members throughout the decade. And then there's Snoopy. To readers unfamiliar with the early days of the strip, Snoopy's appearances here will no doubt come as the biggest surprise. Although Snoopy has started talking/thinking to himself, he does no imitations (except for one brief shark impression), he doesn't sleep atop his doghouse (much less type or fly a Sopwith Camel), and has no fantasy life—in fact, he doesn't even walk upright! But as we know, he is merely biding his time, and his evolution continues its fascinating course within these pages.|Peanuts is the most successful comic strip in the history of the medium as well as one of the most acclaimed strips ever published. (In 1999, a jury of comics scholars and critics voted it the 2nd greatest comic strip of the 20th century—second only to George Herriman's Krazy Kat, a verdict Schulz himself cheerfully endorsed.) Charles Schulz's characters—Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Lucy, Linus, Schroeder, and so many more—have become American icons. A United Media poll in 2002 found Peanuts to be one of the most recognizable cartoon properties in the world, recognized by 94 percent of the total U.S. consumer market and a close second only to Mickey Mouse (96 percent), and higher than other familiar cartoon properties like Spider-Man (75 percent) or the Simpsons (87 percent). In TV Guide's "Top 50 Greatest Cartoon Characters of All-Time" list, Charlie Brown and Snoopy ranked #8.Collects all the "Peanuts" comic strips as originally published in newspapers, including both daily and Sunday strips.
Annotation:
With a classy design by Seth, this box brings together in a snazzy slipcover the first two volumes in Fantagraphics monster rerelease campaign of the COMPLETE PEANUTS. Here we've got Charles Schulz's earliest efforts (many of which are hard to find elsewhere). Character that will soon to be household names get introduced (some in infancy, which they quickly outgrow) and take shape, hinting at the adventures and developments that lie ahead. For fans, there're loads of treats--like meeting Snoopy for the first time as a puppy and then witnessing his first shark impression. Schulz hones his visual style in the first four years of daily and Sunday strips. Garrison Keillor and Walter Cronkite introduce the editions, which also include an essay, interview, analysis of a reconstructed strip, and reference indices.
Author Bio
Charles M. Schulz
A pioneering force in the comic strip industry, Schulz turned his lifelong appreciation of comics and his sensitive, somewhat brooding personality into the highly successful "Peanuts" franchise. Nicknamed "Sparky" after a popular comic strip character, the shy young cartoonist continually doodled during class, receiving encouragement from numerous teachers. After high school, he completed a drawing correspondence course, earning only average marks. He was drafted into World War II service shortly thereafter, where he continued to draw--even decorating soldiers' letters home. After leaving the military, he juggled two jobs, lettering pre-drawn comics and teaching at his alma mater, Art Instruction Schools. Initially selling single-panel cartoons to The Saturday Evening Post in 1948, Schulz sold the "L'il Folks" comic to the St. Paul Pioneer Press in 1950, changing the single-panel format to the now common multi-panel comic strip. For competitive reasons, the United Features Syndicate renamed the strip Peanuts," a name Schulz never liked. The newly syndicated comic strip was an immediate success, running eventually in 2000 newspapers worldwide. Schulz has been credited with transforming the cartooning field with his successful books, TV specials, and merchandising deals. Schulz's most prized award throughout his career was the National Cartoonists' Society's Reuben Award for outstanding cartoonist of the year, which he won in 1955 and in 1964. Critical of comic strips with political agendas, Schulz only used "Peanuts" as a political forum once--to protest the proliferation of sexual harassment claims. Otherwise, he steered clear of hot topics, focusing instead on the active imaginations of his dreamy, unfulfilled characters--many situations culled from his real life. Early in his career, Schulz fell in love with a redheaded accountant, Donna Johnson, who turned down his marriage proposal. Rejected, he married shortly thereafter, a relationship that lasted 21 years. Although his second and final marriage was reportedly a happy one, he apparently never forgot the sting of Donna's rejection, eventually immortalizing her in the "Peanuts" comic strip as the unattainable object of Charlie Brown's desire-- the Little Red-haired Girl. Described by close friends as an insecure, sensitive man, he suffered from numerous depressions and anxiety attacks. After receiving a diagnosis of colon cancer, he announced his retirement from the producing the comic strip, claiming that no other artist should determine the "Peanuts" legacy. He died just hours before the last Sunday edition of the "Peanuts" strip ran--the final strip of a 50-year cartooning career.

Praise

"The first [COMPLETE PEANUTS] volume (1950-52) confronts us afresh with what a brilliant, truly modern and totally weird idea it was to create a comic strip about a chronically depressed child." - Lev Grossman 05/03/2004

"For Fantagraphics, being put in charge of THE COMPLETE PEANUTS is akin to Sub Pop being handed the Beatles' master tapes for reissue. And Fantagraphics has done the strip right..." - Michaelangelo Matos 09/15/2004

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