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The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954 Schulz, Charles M. 1 of 1
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FORMAT: Hardcover
CONDITION:  Brand New
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Description
 

Learn more about The Complete Peanuts 1953-1954:

Format: Hardcover
ISBN-10: 1560976144
ISBN-13: 9781560976141
Sku: 36409358
Publish Date: 10/30/2004
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 7H x 9L x 1.75T
Pages:  344
Age Range:  15 to 19
 
This second volume begins with Peanuts' third full year and a cast of eight: Charlie Brown, Shermy, Patty, Violet, Schroeder, Lucy, Snoopy, and the recently born Linus, who begins to emerge as the most complex and arguably most endearing character in the strip.
From the Publisher:
The second volume in the most eagerly-anticipated publishing project in the history of the American comic strip: the complete reprinting of Charles M. Schulz's 50-year American classic, Peanuts.|Our second volume begins with Peanuts' third full year and a cast of eight: Charlie Brown, Shermy, Patty, Violet, Schroeder, Lucy, the recently born Linus, and Snoopy. By the end of 1954, this will have expanded to nine. Linus still doesn't speak (except, on a few occasions, to himself, à la Snoopy), but Schulz begins laying the foundation for his emergence as the most complex and arguably most endearing character in the strip: garrulous and inquisitive, yet gentle and tolerant. And he evens acquires his "security blanket" in this volume!|Meanwhile, Lucy, an infant just a year ago, has forcefully elbowed herself to the front of the cast, proudly wearing her banner as a troublemaker or, in Schulz's memorable phrase, "fuss-budget." The strong, specific relationships she sets up with each character further contributes to making her central to the strip. (She has earned her cover status on this volume.)|Charlie Brown is clearly in transition. Although his eventual, best-known persona (the lovable, perpetually humiliated round-headed loser) is in evidence in many strips, his brasher, more prankish side as seen in the previous volume (foreshadowing Bill Watterson's future Calvin) shows up, too.|This period's significant new character is Pig-Pen, who would remain one of the main cast members throughout the decade. And then there's Snoopy. To readers unfamiliar with the early days of the strip, Snoopy's appearances here will no doubt come as the biggest surprise. Although Snoopy has started talking/thinking to himself, he does no imitations (except for one brief shark impression), he doesn't sleep atop his doghouse (much less type or fly a Sopwith Camel), and has no fantasy life—in fact, he doesn't even walk upright! But as we know, he is merely biding his time, and his evolution continues its fascinating course within these pages.|This book collects 730 daily and Sunday comic strips, the vast majority of which are not currently available in any in-print Peanuts collection, and over 400 (well over half) of which have never been reprinted since their initial appearance in papers over 50 years ago. The Complete Peanuts is produced in full cooperation with United Media, Charles M. Schulz Creative Associates, and Mr. Schulz's widow, Jean Schulz. Each volume in the series presents two years of strips along with supplementary material in a three-tier page format that accommodates three dailies or one Sunday strip per page. Award-winning graphic novelist Seth is designing the series so that each individual book is sharply recognizable and yet clearly part of a consistent series. Using archival-quality syndicate proofs for virtually every strip in its history, the series boasts the best-looking, crispest reproduction for a classic comic strip ever achieved. The volume's introduction is by revered news journalist Walter Cronkite.|Peanuts is the most successful comic strip in the history of the medium as well as one of the most acclaimed strips ever published. Charles Schulz's characters have become American icons. A Charlie Brown Christmas is as much an annual holiday ritual for families as It's A Wonderful Life. A United Media poll in 2002 found Peanuts to be one of the most recognizable cartoon properties in the world, recognized by 94 percent of the total US consumer market and a close second only to Mickey Mouse (96 percent), and higher than other familiar cartoon properties like Spider-Man (75 percent) or the Simpsons (87 percent). In TV Guide's "Top 50 Greatest Cartoon Characters of All-Time" list, Charlie Brown and Snoopy ranked #8.The second volume of the complete Peanuts collection contains 730 comic strips and chronicles such happenings as the introduction of Pigpen and the establishment of Lucy as a chronic troublemaker.
Annotation:
The second volume of THE COMPLETE PEANUTS collects the activities of Charlie Brown, Lucy, Snoopy, Patty, Shermy, Schroeder, Violet, and the gang. Linus, who's still a baby, hasn't uttered his first word yet and finds security in that blanket during these years. Pigpen comes into the picture, and Lucy embraces center stage and her label as a "fussbudget." Walter Cronkite introduces the book, which also includes a partially reconstituted strip and a very useful index.
Author Bio
Charles M. Schulz
A pioneering force in the comic strip industry, Schulz turned his lifelong appreciation of comics and his sensitive, somewhat brooding personality into the highly successful "Peanuts" franchise. Nicknamed "Sparky" after a popular comic strip character, the shy young cartoonist continually doodled during class, receiving encouragement from numerous teachers. After high school, he completed a drawing correspondence course, earning only average marks. He was drafted into World War II service shortly thereafter, where he continued to draw--even decorating soldiers' letters home. After leaving the military, he juggled two jobs, lettering pre-drawn comics and teaching at his alma mater, Art Instruction Schools. Initially selling single-panel cartoons to The Saturday Evening Post in 1948, Schulz sold the "L'il Folks" comic to the St. Paul Pioneer Press in 1950, changing the single-panel format to the now common multi-panel comic strip. For competitive reasons, the United Features Syndicate renamed the strip Peanuts," a name Schulz never liked. The newly syndicated comic strip was an immediate success, running eventually in 2000 newspapers worldwide. Schulz has been credited with transforming the cartooning field with his successful books, TV specials, and merchandising deals. Schulz's most prized award throughout his career was the National Cartoonists' Society's Reuben Award for outstanding cartoonist of the year, which he won in 1955 and in 1964. Critical of comic strips with political agendas, Schulz only used "Peanuts" as a political forum once--to protest the proliferation of sexual harassment claims. Otherwise, he steered clear of hot topics, focusing instead on the active imaginations of his dreamy, unfulfilled characters--many situations culled from his real life. Early in his career, Schulz fell in love with a redheaded accountant, Donna Johnson, who turned down his marriage proposal. Rejected, he married shortly thereafter, a relationship that lasted 21 years. Although his second and final marriage was reportedly a happy one, he apparently never forgot the sting of Donna's rejection, eventually immortalizing her in the "Peanuts" comic strip as the unattainable object of Charlie Brown's desire-- the Little Red-haired Girl. Described by close friends as an insecure, sensitive man, he suffered from numerous depressions and anxiety attacks. After receiving a diagnosis of colon cancer, he announced his retirement from the producing the comic strip, claiming that no other artist should determine the "Peanuts" legacy. He died just hours before the last Sunday edition of the "Peanuts" strip ran--the final strip of a 50-year cartooning career.

Praise

Publishers Weekly
"...[M]akes for a delicious wallow in a nostalgic world that has a lot more bite than readers may recall....Schultz's...early strips are undeniably crackling....As always, the illustrations are a marvel of simplicity and the insights are haunting." (starred review) 09/20/2004

Product Attributes

Product attributeBook Format:   Hardcover
Product attributeMinimum Age:   11
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0344
Product attributePublisher:   Fantagraphics Books
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