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Author:  J. T. Leroy
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The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things Leroy, J. T. 1 of 1
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FORMAT: Paperback
CONDITION:  Brand New
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Description
 

Learn more about The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 1582342113
ISBN-13: 9781582342115
Sku: 30883365
Publish Date: 6/1/2002
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8.25H x 5.5L x 0.75T
Pages:  247
Age Range:  NA
 
Fresh, raw, and unforgettable, these connected stories of a young boy on the run brought the author a cult following at the age of 16. A national bestseller.
From the Publisher:
A harrowing, darkly comic collection of short stories follows a young boy on a difficult journey through the bleak, complex landscape of modern American life.
The extraordinary stories that brought the author a cult following at the age of sixteen.

These are the stories of a young boy on the run, away from his past, hellbent towards an unknown future. Connected, they form a sometimes harrowing, sometimes bleakly funny, and often tender portrait of a complicated life. Like a modern-day Voltaire, LeRoy bounces his characters from adventure to adventure, each of them unyielding in the belief that the best of all possible worlds lies just around the next corner. Fresh, raw, and absolutely unforgettable, The Heart is Deceitful Above All Things has further established the acclaimed author of Sarah as one of the most compelling voices in contemporary fiction.
Annotation:
Following up the author's debut novel, SARAH, this linked series of stories depict the world of teenage runaways, hookers, and thieves as they try to survive on the streets of San Francisco. Although the author purported to be a young man born in 1980, who drew heavily upon his own experiences as a drug-addicted, cross-dressing hustler for his autobiographical fiction, the New York Times eventually discovered JT LeRoy's true identity in late 2005. Laura Albert, a musician, writer, and phone sex operator born in 1965, wrote LeRoy's books, while her partner Geoffrey Knoop's half-sister Savannah posed as LeRoy for public appearances. In the midst of the controversy, a film based on the book was released in early 2006.
Author Bio
J. T. Leroy
JT "Terminator" LeRoy is a non-existent novelist, the product of one of the biggest and strangest literary hoaxes of all time. For years, LeRoy was known to his friends, fans, and publishers as a young man from West Virginia with a prostitute mother, who had grown up to become a cross-dressing teenage prostitute himself at truck stops across the South. He had eventually made his way to the streets of San Francisco where he was rescued by a psychiatrist who encouraged him to write. By phone, LeRoy began to make contact with some of his favorite writers, including Dennis Cooper and Mary Gaitskill, who championed his work. In 2000, his novel, SARAH, came out, a book assumed by everyone to be a thinly veiled autobiography. It was followed by a collection of short stories titled THE HEART IS DECEITFUL ABOVE ALL THINGS. By phone and email Leroy had cultivated a large network of celebrity friends, admirers, and advocates, including Madonna, Winona Ryder, Billy Corgan, and Gus Van Sant. Notoriously shy, JT LeRoy made rare public appearances and always dressed in dark glasses and a blond wig, usually accompanied by his friend "Speedie," with whom LeRoy lived in a San Francisco squat. However in October, 2005 a New York magazine ran an article suggesting that LeRoy's writing, voice, and identity actually originated with "Speedie" aka Laura Albert, a Brooklyn-born writer, and the public persona was merely an actor playing a role. In 2006, Warren St. John, a writer who had previously written a credulous profile of LeRoy, identified the public "LeRoy" as actually being Savannah Knoop, Albert's sister-in-law, who had been recruited to play the role to allay suspicion. In the subsequent backlash, Albert was lambasted for expropriating sexual abuse, heroin addiction, and HIV-infection simply as a means to get published, make money, and become famous. In a lawsuit in 2007 by the film company that had optioned the rights to SARAH, Albert was found guilty of fraud. However, many consider Albert's decade-long invention and maintenance of a fictional person to be a fascinating experiment in gender-bending and the shape-shifting potential of identity. As author Mary Gaitskill said in New York magazine, "Even if it turned out to be a hoax, it's a very enjoyable one. And a hoax that exposes things about people, the confusion between love and art and publicity. A hoax that would be delightful, and if people are made fools of, it would be okay--in fact, it would be useful."

JT "Terminator" LeRoy is a non-existent novelist, the product of one of the biggest and strangest literary hoaxes of all time. For years, LeRoy was known to his friends, fans, and publishers as a young man from West Virginia with a prostitute mother, who had grown up to become a cross-dressing teenage prostitute himself at truck stops across the South. He had eventually made his way to the streets of San Francisco where he was rescued by a psychiatrist who encouraged him to write. By phone, LeRoy began to make contact with some of his favorite writers, including Dennis Cooper and Mary Gaitskill, who championed his work. In 2000, his novel, SARAH, came out, a book assumed by everyone to be a thinly veiled autobiography. It was followed by a collection of short stories titled THE HEART IS DECEITFUL ABOVE ALL THINGS. By phone and email Leroy had cultivated a large network of celebrity friends, admirers, and advocates, including Madonna, Winona Ryder, Billy Corgan, and Gus Van Sant. Notoriously shy, JT LeRoy made rare public appearances and always dressed in dark glasses and a blond wig, usually accompanied by his friend "Speedie," with whom LeRoy lived in a San Francisco squat. However in October, 2005 a New York magazine ran an article suggesting that LeRoy's writing, voice, and identity actually originated with "Speedie" aka Laura Albert, a Brooklyn-born writer, and the public persona was merely an actor playing a role. In 2006, Warren St. John, a writer who had previously written a credulous profile of LeRoy, identified the public "LeRoy" as actually being Savannah Knoop, Albert's sister-in-law, who had been recruited to play the role to allay suspicion. In the subsequent backlash, Albert was lambasted for expropriating sexual abuse, heroin addiction, and HIV-infection simply as a means to get published, make money, and become famous. In a lawsuit in 2007 by the film company that had optioned the rights to SARAH, Albert was found guilty of fraud. However, many consider Albert's decade-long invention and maintenance of a fictional person to be a fascinating experiment in gender-bending and the shape-shifting potential of identity. As author Mary Gaitskill said in New York magazine, "Even if it turned out to be a hoax, it's a very enjoyable one. And a hoax that exposes things about people, the confusion between love and art and publicity. A hoax that would be delightful, and if people are made fools of, it would be okay--in fact, it would be useful."

Praise

Kirkus Reviews
"Strong, fierce, hard, and frankly astonishing." 04/15/2001

Bookforum
"Not since David Wojnarowicz's memoir CLOSE TO THE KNIVES has a writer depicted a young boy's horrifying existence with such genuine pathos and candor." - Kera Bolonik Summer 2001

New York Times Book Review
"These accounts stun, but with so few digressions their fury seems almost too neat....Yet the reader must acknowledge that LeRoy's stupidly evil landscape is one the author has inhabited. An eyewitness's imagination burns in his language, which is not lyrical but as vivid as a match held close to the face." - Ann Powers 07/29/2001

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