The Management Challenge: Japanese Views (Paperback)

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Product Overview

This book covers motivation and productivity, the impact of Japanese culture on management, perceptions and reality of Japanese industrial relations, the firm and the market, the Japanese financial system, product diversification, strategy for overseas markets, competition and cooperation among Japanese corporations, industrial policy, economic planning, and the Japanese economy.

Specifications

Publisher MIT Press (MA)
Mfg Part# 9780262700337
SKU 30035868
Format Paperback
ISBN10 0262700336
Release Date 4/10/2007
Physical
Dimensions (in Inches) 8.25H x 5.5L x 0.5T
From the Publisher
Editors Note The original contributions in this book present Japanese management as the Japanese see it. They show how an economy that has outperformed ours during the last thirty years works, providing American managers with insights into practices that may spark new solutions to old economic problems. Thurow's introductory essay and his comments on each contribution provide a unifying framework while pointing up the implications that each chapter raises for the reblending of the American economic mixture. What works for the Japanese? As Thurow points out in his introduction, seniority promotions, lifetime employment, a wage structure heavily conditioned by bonuses, a culture that emphasizes the group rather than the individual, attention to good people management, and an efficient labor market--these are some of the ingredients in the Japanese system of payoffs and constraints that have contributed to that country's economic success. Conversely, he notes that high turnover, the lack of willingness to maintain employees on the payroll in exchange for "give-backs" during hard times, the emphasis on blue-collar layoffs, and treatment of human losers hardly contribute to mutual respect and cooperation in American firms. Our focus on improving capital rather than labor markets, on short-term financial objectives, and large bonuses based on current profits have not resulted in an optimal corporate environment. And what about the necessity for industrial policies? As one contributor asks, "Who is watching out for the steel industry and worrying about how to make it viable?" No one? The market? The Japanese experience presented in these essays covers motivation and productivity, the impact of Japanese culture on management, perceptions and reality of Japanese industrial relations, the firm and the market in Japan, the Japanese financial system, product diversification, strategy for overseas markets, competition and cooperation among Japanese corporations, Japan's industrial policy, economic planning in Japan, and the Japanese economy.
Editors Note 1 This book covers motivation and productivity, the impact of Japanese culture on management, perceptions and reality of Japanese industrial relations, the firm and the market, the Japanese financial system, product diversification, strategy for overseas markets, competition and cooperation among Japanese corporations, industrial policy, economic planning, and the Japanese economy.
Editors Note 2 These original essays present Japanese management as the Japanese themselves see it, covers topics including motivation and productivity, Japanese industrial relations, and the Japanese industrial system, with an introductory essay and follow-up comments by the editor
Editors Note 3 What works for the Japanese? As our nation's balance of trade with Japan dips Eastward, American managers ask how Japan's economy has outperformed ours during the past 30 years. Some of the answers may be found in the original contributions in this book which are unique in presenting Japanese management as the Japanese see it. They provide American managers with insights into practices that may spark new solutions to old economic problems.Chapters cover motivation and productivity, the impact of Japanese culture on management, perceptions and reality of Japanese industrial relations, the firm and the market, the Japanese financial system, product diversification, strategy for overseas markets, competition and cooperation among Japanese corporations, industrial policy, economic planning, and the Japanese economy. Thurow's introduction provides a unifying framework and his comments on each chapter point up the implications that each contribution raises for the reblending of the American economic mixture.Lester C. Thurow is Gordon Y. Billard Professor of Economics and Management at MIT.
Product Attributes
Book Format Paperback
Minimum Age 22
Number of Pages 0256
Publisher MIT Press (MA)
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