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The Master Butchers Singing Club Erdrich, Louise/ Erdrich, Louise (NRT) 1 of 1
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Description
 

Learn more about The Master Butchers Singing Club:

Format:  CD
ISBN-10: 0792729056
ISBN-13: 9780792729051
Sku: 36307016
Publish Date: 3/1/2003
See more in Historical
 
Annotation:
A singing German butcher in North Dakota, and a compelling woman named Delphine Watzka, who falls in love with him, are at the center of Erdrich's novel, another in her series of books set in the small town of Argus. A New York Times Notable Book for 2003.
Author Bio
Louise Erdrich
Erdrich's mother was Chippewa, her father German, and she was raised in North Dakota near the Chippewa reservation where her grandparents lived--a setting for much of her work. She attended Dartmouth, where she met the writer Michael Dorris, whom she married in 1981, and from whom she separated shortly before his suicide in 1997. Erdrich and Dorris collaborated on several of their fiction works. In her novels and short stories, Erdrich writes about her Native-American heritage, often transplanting characters from one book to another. Her dominant theme is the struggle to retain traditional Native-American values in the face of poverty, racism, and the pervasiveness of white culture.

Erdrich's mother was Chippewa, her father German, and she was raised in North Dakota near the Chippewa reservation where her grandparents lived--a setting for much of her work. She attended Dartmouth, where she met the writer Michael Dorris, whom she married in 1981, and from whom she separated shortly before his suicide in 1997. Erdrich and Dorris collaborated on several of their fiction works. In her novels and short stories, Erdrich writes about her Native-American heritage, often transplanting characters from one book to another. Her dominant theme is the struggle to retain traditional Native-American values in the face of poverty, racism, and the pervasiveness of white culture.

Praise

New York Times Book Review
"The novel is more naturalistic and more conventional than the author's earlier Argus stories--fewer excursions into magical realism, fewer flights of fantasy--but every bit as emotionally resonant. Through the prism of one family's tangled history, Ms. Erdrich gives us an indelible glimpse of the American dream and the disappointments that can gather in its wake....As in so many of Ms. Erdrich's novels, a plethora of melodramatic events quickly befall the characters in this story....In summary, these developments may seem contrived, and some are left dangling curiously at the end. But whatever doubts the reader might have are swiftly erased by Ms. Erdrich's sheer authority as a storyteller: her instinctive sympathy for her characters, her energetic inventiveness, her effortless ability to connect public and private concerns." - Michiko Kakutani 02/04/2003

New York Times Book Review
"...Erdrich suffers from an addiction to hyperbole and a tendency to overwrite: if there is a choice between a spare way of expressing something and an ornate one, she will usually go for the ornate....She is handicapped, too, by an inability to create believable dialogue....Still, it's easy to see why Erdrich has won so many fans. Part of her success is due to her ability, over the course of the years, to bring a little-known part of the country redolently to life....The result is a vivid glimpse of a way of life that is alien to many urban dwellers yet familiar in odd particulars....[But] THE MASTER BUTCHERS SINGING CLUB is too disorganized, too unfocused, too wide-ranging to sustain much force....What exactly is Erdrich trying to get across? A portrait of a town? A character? A marriage? An exploration of family values...? A sense of historical sweep? An allegory of the triumph of love over death? Or, alternatively, of death over love? There's a little bit of all these things in THE MASTER BUTCHERS SINGING CLUB, but they're mixed together sloppily and are only half-cooked." - Brooke Allen 02/09/2003

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