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The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee Observations on Not Fitting in (Paperback)

Author:  Paisley Rekdal
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Learn more about The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0375708553
ISBN-13: 9780375708558
Sku: 30861871
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 8H x 5.5L x 0.75T
Pages:  224
Age Range:  NA
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In The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee, a timely meditation on mixed race politics, identity, and interracial desire, poet Paisley Rekdal -- daughter of a Chinese American mother and a Norwegian father -- chronicles a soul-searching journey that takes her throughout Asia.

Rekdal teaches English in South Korea where her native colleagues call her a "hermaphrodite." A visit to Taipei with her mother, who doesn't know the dialect, leads to the bitter realization that they are only tourists, which makes her further question her identity. Written with remarkable insight and clarity, The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee lyrically demonstrates that the shifting frames of identity can be as tricky as they are exhilarating.

From the Publisher:


In The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee, a timely meditation on mixed race politics, identity, and interracial desire, poet Paisley Rekdal–daughter of a Chinese American mother and a Norwegian father–chronicles a soul-searching journey that takes her throughout Asia.

In her travels, she teaches English in South Korea where her native colleagues call her a “hermaphrodite,” and is dismissed by her host family in Japan as an American despite her assertion of being half-Chinese. A visit to Taipei with her mother, who doesn’t know the dialect, leads to the bitter realization that they are only tourists, which makes her further question her identity. Written with remarkable insight and clarity, The Night My Mother Met Bruce Lee lyrically demonstrates that the shifting frames of identity can be as tricky as they are exhilarating.

“Insightful and idiosyncratic…. Rekdal’s essays are so engaging that it takes while to realize how much they reveal about the delicate, shifting balance between the ways others perceive us and how we choose to define ourselves.”–Us Weekly

“An engaging and artful memoir…poetic not in its diction but in it elisions, in the spaces she allows between thoughts.”–The New York Times Book Review

“Makes us feel and see the complicated and violent nature of the issue of race and identity. Rekdal writes with eloquence, liveliness, and poignancy.”–Ha Jin, author of Waiting
A poet, the daughter of a Chinese-American mother and a Norwegian father, chronicles her soul-searching journey throughout Asia where she meditates upon mixed race politics, identity, and interracial desire. Reprint.When you come from a mixed race background as Paisley Rekdal does — her mother is Chinese American and her father is Norwegian– thorny issues of identity politics, and interracial desire are never far from the surface. Here in this hypnotic blend of personal essay and travelogue, Rekdal journeys throughout Asia to explore her place in a world where one’s “appearance is the deciding factor of one’s ethnicity.”

In her soul-searching voyage, she teaches English in South Korea where her native colleagues call her a “hermaphrodite,” and is dismissed by her host family in Japan as an American despite her assertion of being half-Chinese. A visit to Taipei with her mother, who doesn’t know the dialect, leads to the bitter realization that they are only tourists, which makes her further question her identity. Written with remarkable insight and clarity, Rekdal a poet whose fierce lyricism is apparent on every page, demonstrates that the shifting frames of identity can be as tricky as they are exhilarating.
Annotation:
This memoirist recounts her many unique experiences with race, as a frequent traveller of half Chinese, half Norwegian heritage. A teacher in South Korea and a tourist in regions as diverse as Japan and Mississippi, Rekdal meditates on family, identity, and ethnicity.

Praise

New York Times Book Review
"At her best, Rekdal paints with the lightest of strokes." - Ann Marlowe 10/15/2000

Book
"[E]ven her [Rekdal's] painful discoveries are mitigated by the freshness and vitality of her voice." January/February 2001

Product Attributes

Product attributeeBooks:   Kobo
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0224
Product attributePublisher:   Vintage Books
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