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Author:  Neil Evernden
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The Social Creation of Nature Evernden, Neil 1 of 1
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FORMAT: Paperback
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Learn more about The Social Creation of Nature:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0801845483
ISBN-13: 9780801845482
Sku: 30152920
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 9H x 6L x 0.5T
Pages:  200
Age Range:  26 to UP
See more in Natural Resources
 

"I think "The Social Creation of Nature" stands Evernden in relation to the present generation roughly as Thoreau stood in relation to New England Transcendentalism."--Max Oelschlaeger, author of "The Idea of Wilderness."

"A thoughtful and illuminating book... For Evernden, ''wildness'' is what should be defended and preserved."-- "New Scientist."

One reason for our failure to "save the earth," argues Neil Evernden, is our disagreement about what "nature" really is--how it works, what constitutes a risk to it, and even whether we ourselves are part of it. Nature is as much a social entity as a physical one. In addition to the physical resources to be harnessed and transformed, it consists of a domain of norms that may be called upon in defense of certain social ideals. In exploring the consequences of conventional understandings of nature, "The Social Creation of Nature" also seeks a way around the limitations of a socially created nature in order to defend what is actually imperiled--"wildness," in which, Thoreau wrote, lies hope for "the preservation of the world."

From the Publisher:
"I think The Social Creation of Nature stands Evernden in relation to the present generation roughly as Thoreau stood in relation to New England Transcendentalism."--Max Oelschlaeger, author of The Idea of Wilderness."A thoughtful and illuminating book. . . . For Evernden, `wildness' is what should be defended and preserved."--New Scientist.One reason for our failure to "save the earth," argues Neil Evernden, is our disagreement about what "nature" really is--how it works, what constitutes a risk to it, and even whether we ourselves are part of it. Nature is as much a social entity as a physical one. In addition to the physical resources to be harnessed and transformed, it consists of a domain of norms that may be called upon in defense of certain social ideals. In exploring the consequences of conventional understandings of nature, The Social Creation of Nature also seeks a way around the limitations of a socially created nature in order to defend what is actually imperiled--"wildness," in which, Thoreau wrote, lies hope for "the preservation of the world."

Product Attributes

Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeMinimum Age:   22
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0200
Product attributePublisher:   Johns Hopkins University Press
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