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Author:  H. G./ MacAdam Wells Illustrator:  Alfred Mac Adam Introduction:  Alfred Mac Adam
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The Time Machine and the Invisible Man Wells, H. G./ MacAdam, Alfred (INT) 1 of 1
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Learn more about The Time Machine and the Invisible Man:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 1593080328
ISBN-13: 9781593080327
Sku: 33902975
Publish Date: 12/1/2003
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 6.75H x 4L x 1T
Pages:  320
Age Range:  NA
 
The Time Traveller (for so it will be convenient to speak of him) was expounding a recondite matter to us. (from the first line)
"The Time Machine, H. G. Wells's first novel, is a tale of Darwinian evolution taken to its extreme. Its hero, a young scientist, travels 800,000 years into the future and discovers a dying earth populated by two strange humanoid species: the brutal Morlocks and the gentle but nearly helpless Eloi.
"The Invisible Man mixes chilling terror, suspense, and acute psychological understanding into a tale of an equally adventurous scientist who discovers the formula for invisibility--a secret that drives him mad.
Immensely popular during his lifetime, H. G. Wells, along with Jules Verne, is credited with inventing science fiction. This new volume offers two of Wells's best-loved and most critically acclaimed "scientific romances." In each, the author grounds his fantastical imagination in scientific fact and conjecture while lacing his narrative with vibrant action, not merely to tell a "ripping yarn," but to offer a biting critique on the world around him. "The strength of Mr. Wells," wrote Arnold Bennett, "lies in the fact that he is not only a scientist, but a most talented student of character, especially quaint character. He will not only ingeniously describe for you a scientific miracle, but he will set down that miracle in the midst of a country village, sketching with excellent humour the inn-landlady, the blacksmith, the chemist's apprentice, the doctor, and all the other persons whom the miracle affects."
Annotation:
At a dinner party in suburban London, the Time Traveller, known to the reader only as the Eminent Scientist, speaks to his guests about the fourth dimension of space--i.e. time. He states that it is possible to travel through time much as one travels through space. The guests are not persuaded, even after seeing the Eminent Scientist's time machine itself. At a later dinner party, the scientist arrives a little late, rumpled and dirty. He tells them he has spent the equivalent of eight days in the year 802,701. He encountered the Eloi, a race of delicate gentle vegetarians who exist in an idyllic garden, and the Morlocks, who live underground and operate the machinery and industrial equipment of the world. The Eloi, in other words are descendents of capitalism, and the Morlocks are the progeny of the proletariat. The Time Traveller then hurries into the year 30,000,000, where he sees a single life form--a round, tentacled thing near the ocean. He concludes that this represents the end of life on earth.
Author Bio
H. G. Wells
Born in Kent, England to poor parents, H. G. Wells was apprenticed to a draper at age 14. Fired, he bounced from job to job, and at age 18 he went to college and became a pupil of scientist Thomas Henry Huxley, the greatest influence on his life. After two troubled marriages, Wells began publishing his novels and grew very wealthy; his first novel, THE TIME MACHINE, was followed by approximately a book a year. He was described by his paramour Rebecca West as "practically off his head, enormously vain, irascible, and in a fantasy world." He died in 1946, one month from his 80th birthday. His influence on other authors is incalculable.

Praise

New York Times
"'The Time Machine'...is worth reading, if you like to read impossible yarns, and though there is scarcely an effort to make the queer invention, by means of which the inventor was projected into the year 800,000 of our era, seem likely, the narrative is smartly written, and the philosophy of the thing is at once obvious (which is desirable when a story book has any philosophy) and interesting." 07/16/1988

Reference Books
"Without question 'The Time Machine' is the best piece of writing. It will take its place among the great stories of our language. Like all excellent works it has meanings within its meaning." - V. S. Pritchett

Reference Books
"Indeed, I would claim that Wells's early fiction is closer to the symbolic romances of Hawthorne or Melville, or to a complex fantasy like 'Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,' or even to the fables of Kafka, than it is to the more strictly scientific speculations of Verne." - Bernard Bergonzi

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