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Ulysses (Paperback)

Author:  James Joyce Editor:  Erroll McDonald Foreword By:  Morris L. Ernst
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Ulysses Joyce, James 1 of 1
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Learn more about Ulysses:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0679722769
ISBN-13: 9780679722762
Sku: 30117873
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Pages:  816
Age Range:  23
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Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed. (from the first line)
This revised volume follows the complete unabridged text as corrected in 1961. Contains the original foreword by the author and the historic court ruling to remove the federal ban. It also contains page references to the first American edition of 1934.
From the Publisher:
This account of several lower class citizens of Dublin describes their activities and tells what some of them were thinking one day in 1904
Annotation:
The novel takes place in the course of one day (June 16, 1904) in the life of the city of Dublin, and follows the course of several interacting characters who embody a series of parallels to Homer's epic. The three main characters are Leopold Bloom, his faithless wife Molly, and Stephen Dedalus of PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN. The novel is a vivid picture of estrangement, alienation, and the disintegration of a society. Joyce uses the capaciousness of the novel as a vehicle for his ideas about art, literature, Ireland, and the nature of heroism, among other things, and its stream-of-consciousness narration and complex wordplay make it one of the most challenging literary experiences in English, as well as an icon of modernism. ULYSSES had a tortured publishing history, finally appearing (on Joyce's 40th birthday) under the aegis of Sylvia Beach at her Paris bookshop Shakespeare & Company. It was met with shock, horror, vituperation, and disgust, but--by a few readers, including T.S. Eliot and Yeats (and by posterity)--as a work of undisputed genius.
Author Bio
James Joyce
During Joyce's growing-up years, his family progressed from middle-class gentility to shabbiness, moving all over the city of Dublin to a series of increasingly rundown houses. He was raised in a repressively Catholic and Philistine atmosphere, attending Jesuit institutions, but by age 16 he was beginning to question Catholicism and to see himself as a writer who would need to transcend his heritage. In 1902 he received a B.A. from University College in Dublin, in modern languages. At that point, he left for Paris, knowing instinctively that in order to write objectively about his homeland he would have to live in exile. After a brief return to Ireland, he settled permanently on the continent in 1904 with Nora Barnacle, an uneducated Dublin girl he called his "portable Ireland." (Nora used to ask him, "Why don't you write books people can read?") The couple lived in Trieste, where Joyce taught English and wrote many of his major works, from 1904 until 1915. Eventually, they settled in Paris, remaining until 1940 (finally marrying in 1931 and producing two children) when they were forced by wartime necessity to evacuate to Switzerland, where Joyce died soon after. Joyce was never financially solvent and relied on the assistance of patrons who believed in his genius. He lived as an expatriate for most of his life, but wrote only about his native city, making Dublin a microcosm of all human experience. In the year 2000, Joyce's handwritten draft of the "Circe" chapter from ULYSSES sold at auction for $1.54 million--an ironic coda to the life of a writer who was perennially short of cash.

During James Joyce's growing-up years in Dublin, his family progressed from middle-class gentility to shabbiness as Joyce's profligate father failed at a series of jobs and business ventures and his mother underwent 16 pregnancies, producing a brood of 10 surviving children. His parents were both talented musicians, and Joyce, himself a gifted singer, remained deeply involved with music all his life. While acknowledging that he received a solid classical education at Jesuit schools, Joyce called the Jesuits "a heartless order," and by age 16 he was beginning to question the narrowness of Catholicism and to see himself as a writer who would need to transcend his repressive heritage. In 1902 he received a B.A. from University College in Dublin, in modern languages. At that point, he left for Paris, knowing instinctively that Ireland would be his subject matter but that, in order to write objectively about his homeland, he would have to live in exile. After a few brief visits to Ireland, he returned permanently to the continent in 1904 with Nora Barnacle, an uneducated Dublin girl he called his "portable Ireland." (Nora used to ask him, "Why don't you write books people can read?") The couple lived in Trieste, where Joyce taught English and wrote many of his major works, from 1904 until 1915. Eventually, they settled in Paris, remaining until 1940 (finally marrying in 1931 and producing two children), when they were forced by wartime necessity to evacuate to Switzerland. Joyce died there soon after, after an operation for a perforated ulcer. He was not quite 50 years old. Joyce was never financially solvent and relied on the assistance of patrons who believed in his genius. He was an expatriate most of his life, but as a writer he remained obsessed with Dublin, making the city a microcosm of all human experience. In the year 2000, Joyce's handwritten draft of the "Circe" chapter from ULYSSES sold at auction for $1.54 million--an ironic coda to the life of a writer who was perennially short of cash.

Praise

New York Times
"A few intuitive, sensitive visionaries may understand and comprehend 'Ulysses,' James Joyce's new and mammoth volume, without going through a course of training or instruction, but the average intelligent reader will glean little or nothing from it--even from careful perusal, one might properly say study, of it--save bewilderment and a sense of disgust. It should be companioned with a key and a glossary like the Berlitz books. Then the attentive and diligent reader would eventually get some comprehension of Mr. Joyce's message." 05/28/1922

New York Times Book Review
"Finally I venture a prophecy. Not 10 men or women out of a hundred can read 'Ulysses' through, and of the 10 who succeed in doing so, five of them will do so as a tour de force. I am probably the only person, aside from the author, who has ever read it twice from beginning to end. I have learned more psychology and psychiatry from it than I did in 10 years at the Neurological Institute." - Joseph Collins 05/28/1996

(unknown)
"Joyce has done something. His influence, however, is local." - Gertrude Stein

"Sexual Personae"
"Joyce has only one subject--Ireland. His writing is both a protest against an intolerable spiritual dependency and ironically an immortalization of the power that bound him." - Camille Paglia

"One of the most remarkable features of ULYSSES is its interest as an investigation into the nature of human consciousness and behavior....Joyce has studied what we are accustomed to consider the dirty, the trivial, and the base elements in our lives with the relentlessness of a modern psychologist; and he has also...done justice to all those elements in our lives which we have been in the habit of describing by such names as love, nobility, truth, and beauty." - Edmund Wilson

Notes and Queries
"After more than seventy years of editorial corrections, specialists will buy the 'uncorrected' edition for its accuracy. Others should choose it as much for Johnson's excellent introduction and notes."

Product Attributes

Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeMinimum Age:   19
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0816
Product attributePublisher:   Vintage Books USA
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