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Author:  Paul Bourke Joint Author:  Donald Debats
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Washington County: Politics and Community in Antebellum America Bourke, Paul 1 of 1
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Learn more about Washington County: Politics and Community in Antebellum America:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0801859468
ISBN-13: 9780801859465
Sku: 30331395
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Dimensions:  (in Inches) 6.25H x 9L x 1T
Pages:  432
Age Range:  26 to UP
 
As one of dozens of counties in the United States named for the nation's first president, Washington County, Oregon, is hardly unique. But as one of the few counties in the 1850s to practice viva voce voting - in which individual ballots are announced publicly rather than recorded in secret - it produced records that offer historians a rare opportunity to explore political, social, and cultural trends in American history in the crucial years that preceded the Civil War. Washington County, a fairly typical laboratory of democracy, gathered together a broad cross-section of antebellum America - rich and poor, Northerners and Southerners, Protestants and Catholics, old natives and new immigrants. Correlating hundreds of individual voting records and voluminous social, cultural, and economic data, Paul Bourke and Donald DeBats take full advantage of the evidence and supply us with an unprecedented study of how people in the 1850s developed political identities and made political choices. In this long-awaited book, Bourke and DeBats show in compelling richness of detail how these decisions more often resulted from private considerations than from the highly publicized appeals of parties and their candidates. Washington County offers us a wonderful example of how the reconfiguring of political and social history can lead to new levels of understanding.
From the Publisher:
"A richly detailed and valuable portrait of an American community in the making . . . Few historians have been more diligent than Paul Bourke and Donald DeBats in reconstructing an American community by linking together a mass of data on its citizens, mapping its neighborhoods, and analyzing political life."-American Historical Review"Bourke and DeBats weave data from a real treasure-trove . . . to produce one of the finest social histories of politics ever written . . . The authors explore the effects of a variety of social and economic variables upon voters' degrees of partisanship and depth of political participation. Any summary fails to do justice to the complexity of their findings... It is beautifully written, set up to be read in such a way that a conflict between two of the settlers which resulted in a murder trial can be viewed as an allegory for the county's political development. In short, it uniquely integrates electoral and social history. It will have widespread appeal, both to professional historians and laypeople."--Register of the Kentucky Historical Society"Bourke and DeBats have identified a magnificent subject--together with wonderful sources--and they have developed an original interpretation that is splendidly suited to make the most of their material. Even more important, Washington County is sure to have a major influence upon the writing of nineteenth-century American social and political history, geography, and political science."--Richard L. McCormick, University of North Carolina, Chapel HillIn the 1850s, Washington County, Oregon, gathered together a broad cross-section of antebellum America. More than that, however, it left for historians a rare opportunity to explore political, social, and cultural trends in American history due to its unique practice of viva voce voting--announcing individual ballots publicly rather than recording them in secret. Paul Bourke and Donald DeBats tap into this remarkable resource to reveal how individual political identities developed and political choices were made. "It is one of the significant contributions of this book that the research tool of viva voce voting permits the individual data from poll books to be linked to political behavior of various dimensions as well as to other measurable aspects of individual behavior, whether religion or economic status. The authors painstakingly develop these materials into a finely grained snapshot of Washington County . . . Throughout, Washington County scintillates with suggestive insights that make it an important contribution to American history."--Reviews in American History"This is a major work of scholarship which, in closely looking at a single county on the distant Pacific coast, nevertheless poses some absolutely fundamental questions. It offers the closest and most satisfying analysis of individual partisanship in the mid-nineteenth century available. The larger implications of their conclusions are sure to be debated for some time to come."--William E. Gienapp, Harvard UniversityAs one of dozens of counties in the United States named for the nation's first president, Washington County, Oregon, is hardly unique. But as one of the few counties in the 1850s to practice viva voce voting - in which individual ballots are announced publicly rather than recorded in secret - it produced records that offer historians a rare opportunity to explore political, social, and cultural trends in American history in the crucial years that preceded the Civil War. Washington County, a fairly typical laboratory of democracy, gathered together a broad cross-section of antebellum America - rich and poor, Northerners and Southerners, Protestants and Catholics, old natives and new immigrants. Correlating hundreds of individual voting records and voluminous social, cultural, and economic data, Paul Bourke and Donald DeBats take full advantage of the evidence and supply us with an unprecedented study of how people in the 1850s developed political identities and made political choices. In this long-awaited book, Bourke and DeBats show in compelling richness of detail how these decisions more often resulted from private considerations than from the highly publicized appeals of parties and their candidates. Washington County offers us a wonderful example of how the reconfiguring of political and social history can lead to new levels of understanding.

In the 1850s, Washington County, Oregon, gathered together a broad cross-section of antebellum America. More than that, however, it left for historians a rare opportunity to explore political, social, and cultural trends in American history due to its unique practice of viva voce voting?announcing individual ballots publicly rather than recording them in secret. Paul Bourke and Donald DeBats tap into this remarkable resource to reveal how individual political identities developed and political choices were made.

Product Attributes

Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeMinimum Age:   22
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0432
Product attributePublisher:   Johns Hopkins University Press
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