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West Marin Review, Volume 1: Prose, Poetry, and Art from West Marin 1 of 1
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Learn more about West Marin Review, Volume 1: Prose, Poetry, and Art from West Marin:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0982282907
ISBN-13: 9780982282908
Sku: 221862109
Publish Date: 5/23/2011
Pages:  124
Age Range:  NA
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From the Publisher:
West Marin Review is a literary and art journal inspired by the extraordinary landscape of western Marin County in Northern California. Framed by the Point Reyes National Seashore and rolling pastureland, this area has long attracted artists and writers, many of whom are featured within the Review alongside others whose work appears here for the first time in print. This publication is a collaborative effort by friends and neighbors, Point Reyes Books, and Tomales Bay Library Association?a volunteer group who wish to share their affinity for landscape and community, and the art that intersection evokes. This first volume includes prose, poetry, and art by Robert Hass, Natalie Goldberg, Mark Dowie, Jules Evens, Susan Hall, Inez Storer, and Andrew Romanoff, as well as works by new talent, children, and youth.
Author Bio
Robert Hass
As an undergraduate at Saint Mary's College in California, where he earned his B.A. in 1963 (he subsequently earned an M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford), Robert Hass took a class which required six hours of bird-watching a week. It became one of his favorite classes and, significantly, the name of his first book, FIELD GUIDE, speaks directly to this memory. His poetry is rich with the rigor of observation, a skill he honed as a biology student and has used to describe the California landscape and its products, including the detectability of its food and wine, and the almost spiritual presences of trees, new grass, qualities of mud, seemingly insignificant items like "tossed-off grapestems," and also the inhabitants of the landscape--foxes, cats, fireflies. However, Hass's scrutiny is leveled equally on human gesture and emotional nuance; thus, the depictions of the natural world, rendered sparely and precisely, are often at the service of psychological and emotional insight. His own autobiography often figures meaningfully into his texts--particularly his mother's alcoholism, his marriage in 1962, his children, his divorce (which is a major portion of his later volume SUN UNDER WOOD), and most importantly, his intellectual engagement with the world combined with a deep humanist impulse. A self-described activist in his student days, Hass has often expressed his commitment to the environment in his poetry, where the respect he lends the presence of nature is such as to constitute a political stand. This is evidenced in his association with the International Rivers Network, on which he has served as a board member. His political commitment has expressed itself in the emphasis on freedom and human dignity in his work, and in his relationship with the Czech poet Czeslaw Milosz, of whom he is the major English translator, bringing Milosz's politically charged subject matter to a wider audience. Serving a double term as United States Poet Laureate from 1995 to 1997, Hass took for his motto "Imagination makes communities." Through this office he criticized the state of American public schools and passionately promoted literacy. A proponent of arts education, Hass also contributed a widely syndicated weekly column to the Washington Post, where he regularly introduced a favorite poem, offering nourishment to a poetry-starved nation. The recipient of a MacArthur grant, Hass has also received high distinctions for each of his books of poetry: the Yale Younger Writers Award for FIELD GUIDE (1972), the William Carlos Williams Award for PRAISE (1979), and the National Book Critics Circle Award for SUN UNDER WOOD (1996), which he also received for his critical volume TWENTIETH CENTURY PLEASURES: PROSE ON POETRY (1984).

As an undergraduate at Saint Mary's College in California, where he earned his B.A. in 1963 (he subsequently earned an M.A. and Ph.D. from Stanford), Robert Hass took a class which required six hours of bird-watching a week. It became one of his favorite classes and, significantly, the name of his first book, FIELD GUIDE, speaks directly to this memory. His poetry is rich with the rigor of observation, a skill he honed as a biology student and has used to describe the California landscape and its products, including the detectability of its food and wine, and the almost spiritual presences of trees, new grass, qualities of mud, seemingly insignificant items like "tossed-off grapestems," and also the inhabitants of the landscape--foxes, cats, fireflies. However, Hass's scrutiny is leveled equally on human gesture and emotional nuance; thus, the depictions of the natural world, rendered sparely and precisely, are often at the service of psychological and emotional insight. His own autobiography often figures meaningfully into his texts--particularly his mother's alcoholism, his marriage in 1962, his children, his divorce (which is a major portion of his later volume SUN UNDER WOOD), and most importantly, his intellectual engagement with the world combined with a deep humanist impulse. A self-described activist in his student days, Hass has often expressed his commitment to the environment in his poetry, where the respect he lends the presence of nature is such as to constitute a political stand. This is evidenced in his association with the International Rivers Network, on which he has served as a board member. His political commitment has expressed itself in the emphasis on freedom and human dignity in his work, and in his relationship with the Czech poet Czeslaw Milosz, of whom he is the major English translator, bringing Milosz's politically charged subject matter to a wider audience. Serving a double term as United States Poet Laureate from 1995 to 1997, Hass took for his motto "Imagination makes communities." Through this office he criticized the state of American public schools and passionately promoted literacy. A proponent of arts education, Hass also contributed a widely syndicated weekly column to the Washington Post, where he regularly introduced a favorite poem, offering nourishment to a poetry-starved nation. The recipient of a MacArthur grant, Hass has also received high distinctions for each of his books of poetry: the Yale Younger Writers Award for FIELD GUIDE (1972), the William Carlos Williams Award for PRAISE (1979), and the National Book Critics Circle Award for SUN UNDER WOOD (1996), which he also received for his critical volume TWENTIETH CENTURY PLEASURES: PROSE ON POETRY (1984).

Goldberg leads nationwide writing seminars, and has taught for many years.

Goldberg leads nationwide writing seminars, and has taught for many years.

Product Attributes

Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0124
Product attributePublisher:   Cameron & Company
Product attributeSeries Part:   01
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