advertisement
Earn Super Points: Write a Review
Sold Out!
Sorry, this selection is currently unavailable.
Women, Crime and the Courts in Early Modern England Kermode, Jennifer (EDT)/ Walker, Garthine (EDT)/ Kermode, Jennifer 1 of 1

Product Details:

Format: Paperback
ISBN-10: 0807845000
ISBN-13: 9780807845004
Sku: 30166793
Publish Date: 4/10/2007
Pages:  224
See more in Sociology / General
 
Recent years have witnessed a considerable body of published research on both crime and women in the early modern period. There have been few attempts, however, to synthesize such studies and to examine in detail the relationship between the law and womens lives. This collection of seven original essays explores that relationship by examining the nature and extent of womens criminal activity and surveying the connections between women, their legal position, and their involvement in legal processes.The words, actions, and treatment of women who came before the courts as plaintiffs, defendants, and witnesses are examined here in a variety of contexts, ranging from the assertion of a variety of rights to scolding, thieving, and witchcraft. The contributors demonstrate that women were far from passive victims in a male-dominated legal system. As both breakers of the law and important agents of its enforcement, women were far more assertive than their formal legal positions would suggest.The contributors are Garthine Walker, Jenny Kermode, Laura Gowing, Martin Ingram, Jim Sharpe, Malcolm Gaskill, Geoffrey L. Hudson, and Tim Stretton. *Author: Kermode, Jennifer/ Kermode, J./ Kermode, Jenny *Binding Type: Paperback *Number of Pages: 224 *Publication Date: 1995/02/01 *Language: English *Dimensions: 8.47 x 5.47 x 0.61 inches
From the Publisher:
Recent years have witnessed a considerable body of published research on both crime and women in the early modern period. There have been few attempts, however, to synthesize such studies and to examine in detail the relationship between the law and women's lives. This collection of seven original essays explores that relationship by examining the nature and extent of women's criminal activity and surveying the connections between women, their legal position, and their involvement in legal processes.

The words, actions, and treatment of women who came before the courts as plaintiffs, defendants, and witnesses are examined here in a variety of contexts, ranging from the assertion of a variety of rights to scolding, thieving, and witchcraft. The contributors demonstrate that women were far from passive victims in a male-dominated legal system. As both breakers of the law and important agents of its enforcement, women were far more assertive than their formal legal positions would suggest.

The contributors are Garthine Walker, Jenny Kermode, Laura Gowing, Martin Ingram, Jim Sharpe, Malcolm Gaskill, Geoffrey L. Hudson, and Tim Stretton.

Praise

(unknown)
"An exciting collection of highly readable essays on highly interesting subjects. The authors are distinguished and innovative historians, and their work should be widely appreciated by scholars, teachers, and students." - Judith Bennett
Product Attributes
Product attributeBook Format:   Paperback
Product attributeNumber of Pages:   0224
Product attributePublisher:   University of North Carolina Press
Advertisement Bottom
BloomReach Content